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Author: Engage for success

CASE STUDY: EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

CASE STUDY: EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

This piece of research surveyed 5000 employees who worked for the East London NHS Foundation Trust. The aim of the study was to measure engagement levels over a couple of years following a number of actions as a response to some unfortunate events.  in 2011, three deaths were reported on one ward in Tower Hamlets, a mental health unit run by East London Foundation Trust. This lead to the Executive team to realise that a fresh look was needed to be taken at culture, staff, engagement and improvements. The leadership team undertook an intensive series of visits to front line services to create a real space for listening to front line staff, taking action on what they heard and enabling staff to make changes to work practices. This in turn lead to development programmes for nurses, values based recruitment to find the most suitable employees, partnerships with local universities to recruit student nurses and develop a culture which was centered on quality improvement. This lead to steady improvements in engagement levels.

Author: Engage for success

FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

This case study included 3000 employees from the national health care services in the UK. The aim of the study was to measure staff engagement following the merge of three hospital sites. One of these sites had had consistently high staff engagement scores over a number of years. One the contrary, one of the other two sites' engagement score had consistently been in the bottom 20%, citing leadership and cultural weaknesses as the major contributing factors. Action had to be taken! A number of initiatives were rolled out including; a strong strategic narrative being communicated by senior leaders; quality walkabouts were launched to connect senior leaders to staff; the launch of a new leadership programme; organisational shared values and associated behaviours were refreshed and embedded in all HR processes such as value based recruitment, induction, appraisal systems. All this paid off, as scores on all the engagement scores increased. 

Author: McKoy-Beckett

Case Study: Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS (1)) (2013)

Case Study: Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS (1)) (2013)

This study included 3100 participants from the Civil Services in the UK. Following the mergence of two government departments, the BIS (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) was created. This had created some communication challenges in terms of integrating different cultures. A main objective following this merge was to increase staff engagement with a more strategic approach to delivering internal communications. Insights from the data collected highlighted setting a clear vision and communicating change as key areas for improvement. Two of the specific aspects included; too much clutter in communication and inability to recall specific BIS wide messages. Communication was stripped back with a brand new strategy and approach - for instance, communication channels got streamlined. The biggest change in the approach was the development of the BIS story - an engaging strategic narrative which enabled them to tell a simple story about BIS' objectives, purpose and achievements. It was important that the BIS story was created and owned by staff, a number of steps were taken to achieve this. Campaign success was evaluated through improvements in the employee survey scores around vision, leadership, communicating change, qualitative feedback from staff focus groups and engagement scores. Longitudinal data found an increase in engagement scores following these initiatives. 

Author: Engage for success

Evidence Case Study: FIS (2012)

Evidence Case Study: FIS (2012)

This was a case study which contained responses from 32 000 employees in the technology industry. FSI, the organisation in which this piece of research was carried out, had launched an employee engagement programme which was heavily tied to a recognition strategy. The purpose of the study was to see how rewards and recognition can be used to drive engagement.  Recognition was used as the cornerstone of all its effort, bringing effective appreciation into the day-to-day experience of all employees. This included the recognition of of a simple job well done or a nomination for an employee's significant impact. A branded recognition platform was launched as the global resource for celebrating people of FIS. The launch was supported by extensive communication and training campaigns. This appeared to bear fruit, as survey responses went up from 50 to 84%, engagement score increased by 16% over the previous 12 months. Managers caring about employee wellbeing and opportunity also went up  31%. Employees feeling appreciation and recognition increased by 61%.
 

Author: GOV

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Pyle and Porthcawl Jobcentre Plus (2016)

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Pyle and Porthcawl Jobcentre Plus (2016)

"This was a case study which explored how employee engagment increased in two Job Centres Plus in the Department for Work and Pensions over a two year period. This job centre saw some great improvement in their engagement index scores from 55% to 86% . Particularly strong improvement was seen in the themes of Leadership and Managing Change, and Learning and Development, and almost all responses to questions covering the themes of My Team and Inclusion and Fair Treatment were positive following the intervention. 
Data drawn from qualitative accounts, suggested that improvements in results had been driven by a number of factors including clear and open communication, visible leadership, understanding staff needs and rewarding success."

Author: GOV

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus (2016)

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus (2016)

This was a case study which explored how employee engagement increased in a Job Centre Plus in the Department for Work and Pensions over a two year period. Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus was a relatively small Jobcentre (19 staff) which saw high footfall from members of the public across North Derbyshire. In 2012, the engagement score was extremely low. However, betewen 2012 and 2014 the team saw an increase in engagement score by 39% points.  Data obtained from qualitative accounts, suggested that improvements in performance metrics also improved engagement. For instance, this included being clearer about objectives and making sure there was a good person-job fit. 
 

Author: Society for human resource management

EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT Revitalizing a Changing Workforce (2016)

EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT Revitalizing a Changing Workforce (2016)

This study contained responses from 600 employees and aimed at identifying the factors which influence overall employee satisfaction and engagement in the workplace. The study found that employees were moderately engaged and the engagement index was only marginally higher than the previous year (a mean increase of 0.1).  Regarding the conditions which contributed to employee engagement, the five top scoring questions included relationship with co-workers, opportunities to use skills/abilities, meaningfulness of the job, the work itself, relationship with immediate supervisor. In contrast, the bottom scoring key drivers were: career advancement opportunities within the organisation, career development opportunities, networking opportunities, organisational commitment to professional development and job specific training.  
 

Author: Aon Hewitt

2017 Trends in Global Employee Engagement Global anxiety erodes employee engagement gains (2017)

2017 Trends in Global Employee Engagement Global anxiety erodes employee engagement gains (2017)

This was a highly comprehensive study of global engagement trends, including five million responses, from over 1000 organisations across more than 60 industries.  The purpose of the study was to measure levels of engagement and compare and contrast them between continents/global regions. The authors also sought to understand changes in engagement in light of the specific socio/political context. In terms of overall engagement scores, just 24 percent of all employees fell into the "Highly Engaged" category and another 39 percent could be categorised as "Moderately Engaged", putting the global engagement score at 63 percent in 2017 compared to 65 percent in 2016. Latin America was found to have the most engaged workforce (this region had also seen the largest increase in engagement score since the previous year, by 3% points), followed by North America and Asia Pacific. Lowest engagement scores were found for Europe. 

Author: CIPD

CREATING AN ENGAGED WORKFORCE (2010)

CREATING AN ENGAGED WORKFORCE (2010)

This study was carried out by the CIPD and included responses from 5291 employees in the UK. The aim of the study was to carry out a thorough and detailed exploration of employee engagement, its antecedents and consequences, using quantitative data, interview data and case studies to support key points.  Overarching findings included that 8% of the respondents in the sample were strongly engaged with their work, whereas 18 were engaged on a daily basis. Engagement levels fared differently depending on the sector. It was found that public sector employees were more strongly, but less frequently engaged than employees in the private sector. Public sector employees also showed higher levels of social and intellectual engagement, whereas private sector employees were more engaged affectively. Top drivers of engagement were found to include meaningfulness; senior management vision and communication; positive perceptions of one's line manager and employee voice.

Author: Harvard Business Review

The Impact of Employee Engagement on Performance (2013)

The Impact of Employee Engagement on Performance (2013)

This report published by the Harvard Business Review included data collected from 568 executives around the globe. The aim of the study was to gain a better understanding of executive views on employee engagement, their understanding of the factors that feed into engagement, how to measure engagement and how to tie these to business metrics. The study yielded some very interesting findings: 71% of respondents ranked employee engagement as very important to achieving overall organisational success. 24% of respondents said that heir organisation was highly engaged. The executives included in the study rank the following factors as being the impactful on employee engagement;  recognition for high performers; individuals having a clear understanding of how job contributes to the strategy; senior leaders continually updating/communicating strategy and business goals communicated company-wide being understood. Executives also believed that executive management is far more engaged  than their juniors

Author: Globeforce

The Employee Experience Index A new global measure of a human workplace and its impact (2016)

The Employee Experience Index A new global measure of a human workplace and its impact (2016)

This study included responses from 23000 employees and consisted of a 3 phase researech project  at developing a measure for engagement and identify leadership behaviours and practices which help drive engagement. A number useful behaviours and practices were identified contributing positively to the employee experience and engagement; senior leaders giving employees a clear picture of the direction the organisation is heading; managers supporting the team; organisational integrity, employee support, meaningful work, feedback, recognition and growth.
 

Author: AON

Managing Employee Engagement During Times of Change (2013)

Managing Employee Engagement During Times of Change (2013)

This interesting practitioner study on employee engagement was carried out in the USA and was concerned with different forms of organisational change. More specifically, the aim of the study was to gain an understanding of how employee engagement can be better managed through periods of organisational change, as levels of employee engagement often plummet during times of uncertainty and ambiguity. The results indicated that particularly two key drivers of engagement were important during times of general change; co-workers making personal sacrifices to help the organisation and company providing a two-way dialogue. Finer grain analyses which delved into the type of change occurring, found some notable differences. During times of merge or acquisitions, senior leadership visibility was particularly important for the maintenance of engagement. During restructuring, company providing encouragement for development was found to be important, whereas company providing a two-way dialogue was important during strategy transformation. 

Author: Tower Watson

Global Workforce Study - Engagement at Risk: Driving Strong Performance in a Volatile Global Environment (2012)

Global Workforce Study - Engagement at Risk: Driving Strong Performance in a Volatile Global Environment (2012)

This study included responses from 32000, global, full-time workers. The aim of the study was to identify the organisational elements which contributed to high employee engagement. Examples of the organisational resources, job characteristics and behaviours found to drive sustainable employee engagement included; effective leadership; manageable stress levels at work; adequate work-life balance; having and understanding goals and objectives; organisational image and reputation.

Author: Robertson-Smith and Markwick

Employee Engagement A review of current thinking (2009)

Employee Engagement A review of current thinking (2009)

This was a systematic review of the academic and practitioner literature on employee engagement, carried out by the IES (The Institute For Employement Studies). It sought to synthesise the current thinking and evidence on the topic. It highlighted some of the facilitators and barriers to employee engagement. The facilitators mentioned in included; positive workplace culture; participative management style and relationship; commitment to CSR and employee well-being; development opportunities; pay, reward and working hours. Barriers were said to include; job insecurity; unfairness; jobs with no space (like call-centre types of job); highly stressful jobs; poor line management behaviour and bullying; working for long periods of time without break.

Author: Anderton and Bevan

Constrained Work? Job enrichment & employee engagement in low wage, low skill jobs (2014)

Constrained Work? Job enrichment & employee engagement in low wage, low skill jobs (2014)

The aim of this study was to identify the factors which could provide job enrichment and employee engagement in low wage, low skill jobs, drawing on experiences from  primarily the call centre industry to illustrate the points made.  Five different data driven case studies were used to support their recommendations. The authors recognised that many aspects of contact/call centre have innate characteristics which very much goes against the typical predictors of engagement such as varied and interesting work, autonomy, career development and contact with employees. Indeed, there appears to be a perception of call centres as being a place of high volume calls with intense monitoring from management and lack of control. Thus, the authors of this paper proposed a 2-step overall framework to address this. - 1st step: Developing an organisational culture of trust, value and empowerment. Step 2: Providing job enrichment opportunities for employees to engage in aspects of "Good Work" (including predictors of engagement). This was predicted to lead to high involvement.
 

Author: CIPD

Emotional or transactional engagement – does it matter? (2012)

Emotional or transactional engagement – does it matter? (2012)

This study was carried out by the CIPD and used a mixed method of both quantitative and qualitative data collection. The aim of the research was to explore the differences between emotional engagement and transactional engagement, and get a better understanding  of the drivers and outcomes of these engagement types. The study presented interesting some findings: PJ-fit; PO fit; Organisational identification; peer support and quality of line manager relationship all were positively correlated with emotional engagemement which in turn was correlated positively with performance, well-being and Citizenship behaviours. Emotional engagement was negatively correlated with burnout, work-family conflict, turnover intentions and deviant behaviours. In contrast, work intensification was positively correlated with transactional engagement, which in turn correlated positively with deviant behaviours, burnout and work-family conflict, and correlated negatively with well-being. This authors pointed out the importance of fostering positive organisational resources to further drive emotional engagement. 

Author: CIPD

LEADING CULTURE CHANGE EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AND PUBLIC SERVICE TRANSFORMATION (2012)

LEADING CULTURE CHANGE EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AND PUBLIC SERVICE TRANSFORMATION (2012)

This report explores the views of chief executives and HR directors in a range of local service organisations to gauge how public service leaders are striving to re-engineer the way public services are delivered. The authors adopted employee engagement as the framework. The document touches on the importance of leaders creating a strategic narrative, integrity in changing the culture, engaging managers and employee voice. Apart from the use of data collected from interviews, case studies are provided throughout to back up points 
 

Author: Tower Watson

Global Workforce Study - At a glance (2014)

Global Workforce Study - At a glance (2014)

This report included responses from 32000 employees. It highlights effective leadership and manager behaviours linked to driving employee engagement. The authors used the concept of "Sutainable Engagement" as the engagement model of choice. This model incorporates three components; traditional Engagement, Enablement and Energy. Based on a combination of scores across those dimensions employees were said to be highly engaged, unsupported, detached or disengaged. Leadership and management were found to influence sustainable engagement, i.e. - in organisations where neither leaders nor managers were perceived as effective, only 8% of the employee population were engaged. On the contrary, in companies where leaders and managers were said to be effective, 72% of employees were found to be highly engaged. Top key drivers of leadership effectiveness included senior leaders being inspirational and effective decision-makers and communicators. Top key drivers of management effectiveness included keeping promises, removing obstacles and treating employees with respect.
 

Author: Tower Watson

Turbocharging Employee Engagement The Power of Recognition From Managers Part 1 — The Engagement Engine (2009)

Turbocharging Employee Engagement The Power of Recognition From Managers Part 1 — The Engagement Engine (2009)

This piece of research formed part one of two studies which surveyed 10'000 individuals from 13 countries, spanning from Germany to Japan. The aim of the study was to examine whether there was an empirical link between manager recognition and employee engagement. More specifically, they wanted to test hypothesis that manager delivered recognition of employee performance would boost levels of employee engagement. The findings did indeed provide support for the hypothesis. For instance, there was a an almost 60% difference in engagement scores between employees who got manager recognition and the ones who did not. The study also outlined behaviours which predict manager recognition. These were grouped into three different clusters; Inclusiveness (e.g. I frequently receive recognition at work.); communication (e.g. my immediate supervisor communicates openly); Trust (e.g. I trust my immediate supervisor).
 

Author: Tower Watson

Turbocharging Employee Engagement The Power of Recognition From Managers Part 2 — The Circle of Recognition (2009)

Turbocharging Employee Engagement The Power of Recognition From Managers Part 2 — The Circle of Recognition (2009)

This piece of research formed part two of two studies which surveyed 10'000 individuals from 13 countries, spanning from Germany to Japan. Whereas the first study showed that manager recognition was linked to higher engagement scores and that manager recognition in turn was predicted by three different dimensions; Inclusiveness; communication and trust; this study focused on the principles used to build those three dimensions. Inclusiveness was centered on availability of recognition opportunities, guided by fair process, outcome, treatment and explanation. For communication the fundamental pieces of advice were relating to unambiguity about the connection between performance and rewards of all types. Lastly, trust was found to be supported by engaging in candid conversations; defining clear and relevant performance targets; holding people accountable for their results.

Author: CIPD/Affinity

Managing for sustainable employee engagement Developing a behavioural framework (2012)

Managing for sustainable employee engagement Developing a behavioural framework (2012)

This piece of research was carried out by Affinity at Work for the CIPD. The aim of this project was to identify the behavioural indicators in managers which contribute to sustainable employee engagement through a rigorous three staged process. A 5-factor framework was developed and contained the following competencies; "Open, fair and consent"; "Handling conflict and problems; "Knowledge, clarity and guidance"; "Building and sustaining relationships"; "Supporting development"
 

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Author: Engage for success

CASE STUDY: EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

CASE STUDY: EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

This piece of research surveyed 5000 employees who worked for the East London NHS Foundation Trust. The aim of the study was to measure engagement levels over a couple of years following a number of actions as a response to some unfortunate events.  in 2011, three deaths were reported on one ward in Tower Hamlets, a mental health unit run by East London Foundation Trust. This lead to the Executive team to realise that a fresh look was needed to be taken at culture, staff, engagement and improvements. The leadership team undertook an intensive series of visits to front line services to create a real space for listening to front line staff, taking action on what they heard and enabling staff to make changes to work practices. This in turn lead to development programmes for nurses, values based recruitment to find the most suitable employees, partnerships with local universities to recruit student nurses and develop a culture which was centered on quality improvement. This lead to steady improvements in engagement levels.

Author: Engage for success

CASE STUDY: EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

This piece of research surveyed 5000 employees who worked for the East London NHS Foundation Trust. The aim of the study was to measure engagement levels over a couple of years following a number of actions as a response to some unfortunate events.  in 2011, three deaths were reported on one ward in Tower Hamlets, a mental health unit run by East London Foundation Trust. This lead to the Executive team to realise that a fresh look was needed to be taken at culture, staff, engagement and improvements. The leadership team undertook an intensive series of visits to front line services to create a real space for listening to front line staff, taking action on what they heard and enabling staff to make changes to work practices. This in turn lead to development programmes for nurses, values based recruitment to find the most suitable employees, partnerships with local universities to recruit student nurses and develop a culture which was centered on quality improvement. This lead to steady improvements in engagement levels.

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Author: Engage for success

FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

This case study included 3000 employees from the national health care services in the UK. The aim of the study was to measure staff engagement following the merge of three hospital sites. One of these sites had had consistently high staff engagement scores over a number of years. One the contrary, one of the other two sites' engagement score had consistently been in the bottom 20%, citing leadership and cultural weaknesses as the major contributing factors. Action had to be taken! A number of initiatives were rolled out including; a strong strategic narrative being communicated by senior leaders; quality walkabouts were launched to connect senior leaders to staff; the launch of a new leadership programme; organisational shared values and associated behaviours were refreshed and embedded in all HR processes such as value based recruitment, induction, appraisal systems. All this paid off, as scores on all the engagement scores increased. 

Author: Engage for success

FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST (2017)

This case study included 3000 employees from the national health care services in the UK. The aim of the study was to measure staff engagement following the merge of three hospital sites. One of these sites had had consistently high staff engagement scores over a number of years. One the contrary, one of the other two sites' engagement score had consistently been in the bottom 20%, citing leadership and cultural weaknesses as the major contributing factors. Action had to be taken! A number of initiatives were rolled out including; a strong strategic narrative being communicated by senior leaders; quality walkabouts were launched to connect senior leaders to staff; the launch of a new leadership programme; organisational shared values and associated behaviours were refreshed and embedded in all HR processes such as value based recruitment, induction, appraisal systems. All this paid off, as scores on all the engagement scores increased. 

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Author: McKoy-Beckett

Case Study: Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS (1)) (2013)

Case Study: Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS (1)) (2013)

This study included 3100 participants from the Civil Services in the UK. Following the mergence of two government departments, the BIS (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) was created. This had created some communication challenges in terms of integrating different cultures. A main objective following this merge was to increase staff engagement with a more strategic approach to delivering internal communications. Insights from the data collected highlighted setting a clear vision and communicating change as key areas for improvement. Two of the specific aspects included; too much clutter in communication and inability to recall specific BIS wide messages. Communication was stripped back with a brand new strategy and approach - for instance, communication channels got streamlined. The biggest change in the approach was the development of the BIS story - an engaging strategic narrative which enabled them to tell a simple story about BIS' objectives, purpose and achievements. It was important that the BIS story was created and owned by staff, a number of steps were taken to achieve this. Campaign success was evaluated through improvements in the employee survey scores around vision, leadership, communicating change, qualitative feedback from staff focus groups and engagement scores. Longitudinal data found an increase in engagement scores following these initiatives. 

Author: McKoy-Beckett

Case Study: Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS (1)) (2013)

This study included 3100 participants from the Civil Services in the UK. Following the mergence of two government departments, the BIS (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) was created. This had created some communication challenges in terms of integrating different cultures. A main objective following this merge was to increase staff engagement with a more strategic approach to delivering internal communications. Insights from the data collected highlighted setting a clear vision and communicating change as key areas for improvement. Two of the specific aspects included; too much clutter in communication and inability to recall specific BIS wide messages. Communication was stripped back with a brand new strategy and approach - for instance, communication channels got streamlined. The biggest change in the approach was the development of the BIS story - an engaging strategic narrative which enabled them to tell a simple story about BIS' objectives, purpose and achievements. It was important that the BIS story was created and owned by staff, a number of steps were taken to achieve this. Campaign success was evaluated through improvements in the employee survey scores around vision, leadership, communicating change, qualitative feedback from staff focus groups and engagement scores. Longitudinal data found an increase in engagement scores following these initiatives. 

x
Author: Engage for success

Evidence Case Study: FIS (2012)

Evidence Case Study: FIS (2012)

This was a case study which contained responses from 32 000 employees in the technology industry. FSI, the organisation in which this piece of research was carried out, had launched an employee engagement programme which was heavily tied to a recognition strategy. The purpose of the study was to see how rewards and recognition can be used to drive engagement.  Recognition was used as the cornerstone of all its effort, bringing effective appreciation into the day-to-day experience of all employees. This included the recognition of of a simple job well done or a nomination for an employee's significant impact. A branded recognition platform was launched as the global resource for celebrating people of FIS. The launch was supported by extensive communication and training campaigns. This appeared to bear fruit, as survey responses went up from 50 to 84%, engagement score increased by 16% over the previous 12 months. Managers caring about employee wellbeing and opportunity also went up  31%. Employees feeling appreciation and recognition increased by 61%.
 

Author: Engage for success

Evidence Case Study: FIS (2012)

This was a case study which contained responses from 32 000 employees in the technology industry. FSI, the organisation in which this piece of research was carried out, had launched an employee engagement programme which was heavily tied to a recognition strategy. The purpose of the study was to see how rewards and recognition can be used to drive engagement.  Recognition was used as the cornerstone of all its effort, bringing effective appreciation into the day-to-day experience of all employees. This included the recognition of of a simple job well done or a nomination for an employee's significant impact. A branded recognition platform was launched as the global resource for celebrating people of FIS. The launch was supported by extensive communication and training campaigns. This appeared to bear fruit, as survey responses went up from 50 to 84%, engagement score increased by 16% over the previous 12 months. Managers caring about employee wellbeing and opportunity also went up  31%. Employees feeling appreciation and recognition increased by 61%.
 

x
Author: GOV

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Pyle and Porthcawl Jobcentre Plus (2016)

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Pyle and Porthcawl Jobcentre Plus (2016)

"This was a case study which explored how employee engagment increased in two Job Centres Plus in the Department for Work and Pensions over a two year period. This job centre saw some great improvement in their engagement index scores from 55% to 86% . Particularly strong improvement was seen in the themes of Leadership and Managing Change, and Learning and Development, and almost all responses to questions covering the themes of My Team and Inclusion and Fair Treatment were positive following the intervention. 
Data drawn from qualitative accounts, suggested that improvements in results had been driven by a number of factors including clear and open communication, visible leadership, understanding staff needs and rewarding success."

Author: GOV

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Pyle and Porthcawl Jobcentre Plus (2016)

"This was a case study which explored how employee engagment increased in two Job Centres Plus in the Department for Work and Pensions over a two year period. This job centre saw some great improvement in their engagement index scores from 55% to 86% . Particularly strong improvement was seen in the themes of Leadership and Managing Change, and Learning and Development, and almost all responses to questions covering the themes of My Team and Inclusion and Fair Treatment were positive following the intervention. 
Data drawn from qualitative accounts, suggested that improvements in results had been driven by a number of factors including clear and open communication, visible leadership, understanding staff needs and rewarding success."

x
Author: GOV

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus (2016)

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus (2016)

This was a case study which explored how employee engagement increased in a Job Centre Plus in the Department for Work and Pensions over a two year period. Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus was a relatively small Jobcentre (19 staff) which saw high footfall from members of the public across North Derbyshire. In 2012, the engagement score was extremely low. However, betewen 2012 and 2014 the team saw an increase in engagement score by 39% points.  Data obtained from qualitative accounts, suggested that improvements in performance metrics also improved engagement. For instance, this included being clearer about objectives and making sure there was a good person-job fit. 
 

Author: GOV

Employee engagement and wellbeing: Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus (2016)

This was a case study which explored how employee engagement increased in a Job Centre Plus in the Department for Work and Pensions over a two year period. Clay Cross Jobcentre Plus was a relatively small Jobcentre (19 staff) which saw high footfall from members of the public across North Derbyshire. In 2012, the engagement score was extremely low. However, betewen 2012 and 2014 the team saw an increase in engagement score by 39% points.  Data obtained from qualitative accounts, suggested that improvements in performance metrics also improved engagement. For instance, this included being clearer about objectives and making sure there was a good person-job fit. 
 

x
Author: Society for human resource management

EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT Revitalizing a Changing Workforce (2016)

EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT Revitalizing a Changing Workforce (2016)

This study contained responses from 600 employees and aimed at identifying the factors which influence overall employee satisfaction and engagement in the workplace. The study found that employees were moderately engaged and the engagement index was only marginally higher than the previous year (a mean increase of 0.1).  Regarding the conditions which contributed to employee engagement, the five top scoring questions included relationship with co-workers, opportunities to use skills/abilities, meaningfulness of the job, the work itself, relationship with immediate supervisor. In contrast, the bottom scoring key drivers were: career advancement opportunities within the organisation, career development opportunities, networking opportunities, organisational commitment to professional development and job specific training.  
 

Author: Society for human resource management

EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT Revitalizing a Changing Workforce (2016)

This study contained responses from 600 employees and aimed at identifying the factors which influence overall employee satisfaction and engagement in the workplace. The study found that employees were moderately engaged and the engagement index was only marginally higher than the previous year (a mean increase of 0.1).  Regarding the conditions which contributed to employee engagement, the five top scoring questions included relationship with co-workers, opportunities to use skills/abilities, meaningfulness of the job, the work itself, relationship with immediate supervisor. In contrast, the bottom scoring key drivers were: career advancement opportunities within the organisation, career development opportunities, networking opportunities, organisational commitment to professional development and job specific training.  
 

x
Author: Aon Hewitt

2017 Trends in Global Employee Engagement Global anxiety erodes employee engagement gains (2017)

2017 Trends in Global Employee Engagement Global anxiety erodes employee engagement gains (2017)

This was a highly comprehensive study of global engagement trends, including five million responses, from over 1000 organisations across more than 60 industries.  The purpose of the study was to measure levels of engagement and compare and contrast them between continents/global regions. The authors also sought to understand changes in engagement in light of the specific socio/political context. In terms of overall engagement scores, just 24 percent of all employees fell into the "Highly Engaged" category and another 39 percent could be categorised as "Moderately Engaged", putting the global engagement score at 63 percent in 2017 compared to 65 percent in 2016. Latin America was found to have the most engaged workforce (this region had also seen the largest increase in engagement score since the previous year, by 3% points), followed by North America and Asia Pacific. Lowest engagement scores were found for Europe. 

Author: Aon Hewitt

2017 Trends in Global Employee Engagement Global anxiety erodes employee engagement gains (2017)

This was a highly comprehensive study of global engagement trends, including five million responses, from over 1000 organisations across more than 60 industries.  The purpose of the study was to measure levels of engagement and compare and contrast them between continents/global regions. The authors also sought to understand changes in engagement in light of the specific socio/political context. In terms of overall engagement scores, just 24 percent of all employees fell into the "Highly Engaged" category and another 39 percent could be categorised as "Moderately Engaged", putting the global engagement score at 63 percent in 2017 compared to 65 percent in 2016. Latin America was found to have the most engaged workforce (this region had also seen the largest increase in engagement score since the previous year, by 3% points), followed by North America and Asia Pacific. Lowest engagement scores were found for Europe. 

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