Academic research

<p>We have selected some of the strongest academic research regarding interventions to manage the return to work process following mental health sickness absence and provided summaries below. All studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals and are presented under four headings: Prevalence and literature reviews – a summary of leading systematic reviews, meta-analyses and studies providing further insight into return to work following mental-ill health research; Individual Interventions – return to work interventions focused at the individual; Manager Interventions – interventions aimed at supporting managers/leaders who are managing an employee through the return to work process and Practitioner Interventions – return to work interventions focused towards the practitioner.</p>
PRINT
Author: Blank, Peters, Pickvance, Wilford & MacDonald

A systematic review of the factors which predict return to work for people suffering episodes of poor mental health (2008)

A systematic review of the factors which predict return to work for people suffering episodes of poor mental health (2008)

The findings from this review identified a number of risk factors that prevent a successful RTW. Drawing from 14 studies, these risk factors included work factors (e.g. high job stressors, low job grade), health risk behaviours, social status/demographics and medial characteristics. There was no consistent evidence for the role of demographic factors influencing RTW decisions. In conclusion, the study highlighted the need for more consistent use of terminology and broader samples in order to draw firm conclusions.

Author: Pomaki, Franche, Murray, Khushrushahi & Lampinen

Workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for workers with common mental health conditions: a review of the literature (2012)

Workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for workers with common mental health conditions: a review of the literature (2012)

In this paper, eight studies were reviewed to summarise the evidence of workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for those with mental health conditions. This review noted three components which were found to improve work outcomes (i.e. absence duration, work functioning, economic costs and quality of life). These included: facilitated access to treatment, provision of workplace-based high intensity psychological intervention and facilitated navigation through the disability management system. The studies included in this review followed employees up to one year, and therefore it offers limited understanding of the long-term effects of such interventions. The review highlights the need to consider the recurring nature of mental health conditions and the long term effect of workplace- based interventions.

Author: Alonso, Marco & Andani

Reducing the time until psychotherapy initiation reduces sick leave duration in participants diagnosed with anxiety and mood disorders (2017)

Reducing the time until psychotherapy initiation reduces sick leave duration in participants diagnosed with anxiety and mood disorders (2017)

This paper investigated whether the length of sick leave was associated with the time taken to initiate psychotherapy for those suffering with anxiety and depressive disorders. The authors also considered age, duration of psychotherapy, length of sick leave, time until returning to work and disorder diagnosis of the Spanish workers in this population. They found that the length of sick leave was positively related to the time taken to initiate psychotherapy. From these results, the authors recommend that time until beginning psychotherapy is reduced for those on sick leave with common mental disorders and suggest the need for guidelines/plans for health specialists to avoid lengthy evaluation and treatment procedures.

Author: Dalgaard, Aschbacher, Andersen, Glasscock, Willert, Carstensen & Biering

Return to work after work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial of a work-focused cognitive behavioral intervention (2017)

Return to work after work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial of a work-focused cognitive behavioral intervention (2017)

This study evaluated the effect of a stress management intervention on return to work (RTW). One hundred and sixty-three Danish patients who were on sick leave due to a work-related stress disorder or depression, were randomly assigned to three groups; an intervention group, control A group (who were given a clinical assessment but no treatment) and control B group (no clinical assessment or treatment). Those in the intervention group received a work-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and optional workplace intervention. The findings showed that those in the intervention group returned to work four weeks earlier than the control group A. These results suggest that a CBT intervention can encourage faster lasting RTW in comparison to the control group A.

Author: Arends, van der Klink, van Rhenen, de Boer & Bültmann

Prevention of recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders: results of a cluster-randomised controlled trial (2014)

Prevention of recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders: results of a cluster-randomised controlled trial (2014)

This study investigates recurrent sickness absence by evaluating the SHARP at work intervention for workers, who return to work (RTW) following sickness, due to common mental disorders (CMD). The five step SHARP intervention is evidence based guidance, grounded in empowerment theories to support workers with mental health disorders RTW. To evaluate SHARP Dutch participants were split into either a SHARP or Care as Usual (CAU) group. Follow up feedback sessions were scheduled with Occupational Physicians at six, twelve and eighteen months to assess the incidence of recurrent SA. The findings showed that at each follow up the incidence of recurrent SA was lower for the SHARP group in comparison to the CAU group, emphasising the importance of continual care after RTW. These findings suggest that the SHARP at work intervention can help to reduce recurrent SA in workers with CMD. 

Author: Volker, Zijlstra-Vlasveld, Anema, Beekman, Brouwers, Emons & van der Feltz-Cornelis

Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial (2015)

Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial (2015)

Two hundred and twenty sick listed employees (due to common mental disorders) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group, in order to evaluate a blended ehealth intervention (ECO) in comparison with care as casual (CAU) on time to return to work (RTW). The ECO intervention was a tailor-made ehealth module ranging from six to seventeen sessions (dependent on the individual’s symptoms and cognitions surrounding RTW). Those in the CAU group returned on average after 77 days sick leave, while those in the ECO group returned after 50 days, however there was no difference between groups in relation to full RTW. Further, more employees from the  ECO group achieved remission after nine months compared to the CAU group.

Author: Pedersen, Søgaard, Labriola, Nohr & Jensen

Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder: a randomised controlled trial (2015)

Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder: a randomised controlled trial (2015)

This study evaluated the effectiveness of psychoeducation on return to work (RTW) for those on sick leave due to mental health disorders in Denmark. 430 employees on sick leave were randomly assigned to either an intervention or control group. The intervention group received six two-hour psychoeducation sessions and were measured on the relative risk (RR) of a full RTW. The results showed that during the first three months the intervention group had significantly higher RR of not fully returning to work and those who participated in four out of six psychoeducation sessions returned slower than the control group. However, after six months both groups had a similar RR of a full RTW. These findings suggest that contrary to expectations, psychoeducation should not be recommended to facilitate RTW for those on sick leave due to a mental disorder.

Author: Lagerveld, Blonk, Brenninkmeijer, Meij, Schaufeli & Hurrell,

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study (2012)

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study (2012)

This study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention (W-CBT) with an optional work and return to work component in comparison with the usual cognitive psychotherapy intervention (CBT). Employees on sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMD) were split into either the CBT or the W-CBT group and followed up at three, six and twelve months later. Findings showed that employees in the W-CBT group returned to work sixty-five days earlier than those in the CBT group (and partially returned to work twelve days earlier). Work-focused cognitive psychotherapy may speed up an employee’s return to work, which can in turn provide some financial gains to employers.

Author: Victor, Lau & Ruud

Predictors of return to work among patients in treatment for common mental disorders: a pre-post study (2017)

Predictors of return to work among patients in treatment for common mental disorders: a pre-post study (2017)

This paper investigates factors which are associated with the return to work (RTW) process in those with common mental disorders (CMD). One hundred and sixty-four CMD patients were treated in a RTW clinic in Norway. This pre-post study considered changes in symptoms and functioning of the CMD participants as a result of the psychotherapy treatment for RTW. Positive expectations of future work ability, higher work ability at baseline and focus on RTW during treatment were all positive predictors of RTW. However, having a history of psychiatric treatment was found to be a negative predictor of RTW amongst those with CMD.

Author: Munir, Yarker, Hicks & Donaldson-Feilder

Returning employees back to work: developing a measure for supervisors to support return to work (SSRW) (2012)

Returning employees back to work: developing a measure for supervisors to support return to work (SSRW) (2012)

This paper presents a measure that outlines the behaviours of line managers required to support return to work (during long term sick leave and after an employee has returned to work). The study used focus groups and interviews, as well as questionnaires with managers and returning employees to examine associations between manager behaviour and employee’s well-being, job satisfaction and sickness absence length.  This measure could be used to identify manager’s strengths and development needs when they are managing an employee returning to work following sickness absence.

Author: Milligan-Saville et al.

Workplace mental health training for managers and its effect on sick leave in employees: a cluster randomised controlled trial (2017)

Workplace mental health training for managers and its effect on sick leave in employees: a cluster randomised controlled trial (2017)

This study investigated the effect of mental health training for managers on dealing with employees suffering from mental health problems and how this affects sickness absence. Managers from an Australian fire and rescue service undertook a four-hour mental health training programme and were followed up, along with their employees after six months. In the intervention group, work-related sickness leave decreased, whilst this increased in the control group. The difference between both groups was found to be significant and the return on investment was £9.98 per £1 spent on mental health training for managers. The findings suggest that mental health training for managers can help to reduce work-related sickness absence and have potential financial gains.

Author: van Beurden, van der Klink, Brouwers, Joosen, Mathijssen, Terluin & van Weeghel

Effect of an intervention to enhance guideline adherence of occupational physicians on return-to-work self-efficacy in workers sick-listed with common mental disorders (2015)

Effect of an intervention to enhance guideline adherence of occupational physicians on return-to-work self-efficacy in workers sick-listed with common mental disorders (2015)

This study aimed to evaluate an intervention designed to improve self-efficacy, thereby improving return to work outcomes. In this study Occupational Physicians (OP) were randomly assigned to either a control or intervention group (which enhances adherence to mental health guidelines to enhance return to work (RTW) self-efficacy. The findings of this study showed that workers who had an OP in the intervention group had a significant increase in RTW self-efficacy in comparison with the control group. In terms of RTW, the intervention had no influence on the predictive association between RTW self-efficacy and RTW after three months. Interestingly, workers who had a higher baseline of RTW self-efficacy were significantly associated with a full RTW three months later, although this was not influenced by the intervention group.

Author: Norder, van der Ben, Roelen, Heymans, van der Klink & Bültmann

Beyond return to work from sickness absence due to mental disorders: 5-year longitudinal study of employment status among production workers (2017)

Beyond return to work from sickness absence due to mental disorders: 5-year longitudinal study of employment status among production workers (2017)

This study aimed to examine the work patterns of employees following sickness absence. The study followed 4,612 Dutch male workers who had taken sickness absence, 552 of which were due to mental health. Over a five period, the authors compared the employment status of those who had taken mental ill-health related sickness absence to all other absences, in the time after their return to work (RTW). The findings showed that workers whose sickness absence was mental ill-health related were more likely to have left their job (18%) in comparison with workers without mental ill-health (9%) in the five year period following their RTW. In addition, after the first year follow up, workers with mental ill-health made the decision to leave their job, whilst years later workers were dismissed due poor work functioning. These finding highlight the importance of continual care from healthcare professionals to support workers with mental ill-health sickness absence after they have returned to continue in employment.

Author: Andersen, Nielsen & Brinkmann

Meta-synthesis of qualitative research on return to work among employees with common mental disorders (2012)

Meta-synthesis of qualitative research on return to work among employees with common mental disorders (2012)

This paper considered the facilitators and challenges faced by employees returning to work with common mental disorders (CMD) and their perceptions of this process and the factors which contribute to an optimal return to work (RTW) intervention for employees with CMD. Eight qualitative studies were included in the review. Five key RTW concepts were noted; handling individual demands, accommodations and social support, different interests between professionals, the right time to return and gaps between intentions and implementation. Pre-illness conditions and insufficient coordination between professionals were also found to influence the RTW process. Due to the challenges highlighted, the authors recommend that optimal RTW interventions be based on a biopsychosocial model. A limitation of this study is the small number of studies included within this review and their contextual differences (e.g. conducted in different countries, severity of CMD varied and different qualitative methods applied).

Author: Nielsen, Yarker, Munir & Bültmann

IGLOO: An integrated framework for sustainable return to work in workers with common mental disorders (2018)

IGLOO: An integrated framework for sustainable return to work in workers with common mental disorders (2018)

This paper presents an integrated framework and a definition of sustainable return to work (RTW) for employees with common mental health disorders. This framework also considers the resources in the home and work environments that are required for a successful, sustainable return to work. The IGLOO framework introduces the need to consider individual resources, group resources, leader resources or links to services, organisational resources and omnibus or societal/cultural resources. Based on the conservation of resources (COR) theory, the authors have developed ten propositions for the resources relating to sustainable RTW in work and non-work contexts to future research.

Sort By Relevance
Sort By Date Published
Author: Blank, Peters, Pickvance, Wilford & MacDonald

A systematic review of the factors which predict return to work for people suffering episodes of poor mental health (2008)

A systematic review of the factors which predict return to work for people suffering episodes of poor mental health (2008)

The findings from this review identified a number of risk factors that prevent a successful RTW. Drawing from 14 studies, these risk factors included work factors (e.g. high job stressors, low job grade), health risk behaviours, social status/demographics and medial characteristics. There was no consistent evidence for the role of demographic factors influencing RTW decisions. In conclusion, the study highlighted the need for more consistent use of terminology and broader samples in order to draw firm conclusions.

Author: Blank, Peters, Pickvance, Wilford & MacDonald

A systematic review of the factors which predict return to work for people suffering episodes of poor mental health (2008)

The findings from this review identified a number of risk factors that prevent a successful RTW. Drawing from 14 studies, these risk factors included work factors (e.g. high job stressors, low job grade), health risk behaviours, social status/demographics and medial characteristics. There was no consistent evidence for the role of demographic factors influencing RTW decisions. In conclusion, the study highlighted the need for more consistent use of terminology and broader samples in order to draw firm conclusions.

x
Author: Pomaki, Franche, Murray, Khushrushahi & Lampinen

Workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for workers with common mental health conditions: a review of the literature (2012)

Workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for workers with common mental health conditions: a review of the literature (2012)

In this paper, eight studies were reviewed to summarise the evidence of workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for those with mental health conditions. This review noted three components which were found to improve work outcomes (i.e. absence duration, work functioning, economic costs and quality of life). These included: facilitated access to treatment, provision of workplace-based high intensity psychological intervention and facilitated navigation through the disability management system. The studies included in this review followed employees up to one year, and therefore it offers limited understanding of the long-term effects of such interventions. The review highlights the need to consider the recurring nature of mental health conditions and the long term effect of workplace- based interventions.

Author: Pomaki, Franche, Murray, Khushrushahi & Lampinen

Workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for workers with common mental health conditions: a review of the literature (2012)

In this paper, eight studies were reviewed to summarise the evidence of workplace-based work disability prevention interventions for those with mental health conditions. This review noted three components which were found to improve work outcomes (i.e. absence duration, work functioning, economic costs and quality of life). These included: facilitated access to treatment, provision of workplace-based high intensity psychological intervention and facilitated navigation through the disability management system. The studies included in this review followed employees up to one year, and therefore it offers limited understanding of the long-term effects of such interventions. The review highlights the need to consider the recurring nature of mental health conditions and the long term effect of workplace- based interventions.

x
Author: Alonso, Marco & Andani

Reducing the time until psychotherapy initiation reduces sick leave duration in participants diagnosed with anxiety and mood disorders (2017)

Reducing the time until psychotherapy initiation reduces sick leave duration in participants diagnosed with anxiety and mood disorders (2017)

This paper investigated whether the length of sick leave was associated with the time taken to initiate psychotherapy for those suffering with anxiety and depressive disorders. The authors also considered age, duration of psychotherapy, length of sick leave, time until returning to work and disorder diagnosis of the Spanish workers in this population. They found that the length of sick leave was positively related to the time taken to initiate psychotherapy. From these results, the authors recommend that time until beginning psychotherapy is reduced for those on sick leave with common mental disorders and suggest the need for guidelines/plans for health specialists to avoid lengthy evaluation and treatment procedures.

Author: Alonso, Marco & Andani

Reducing the time until psychotherapy initiation reduces sick leave duration in participants diagnosed with anxiety and mood disorders (2017)

This paper investigated whether the length of sick leave was associated with the time taken to initiate psychotherapy for those suffering with anxiety and depressive disorders. The authors also considered age, duration of psychotherapy, length of sick leave, time until returning to work and disorder diagnosis of the Spanish workers in this population. They found that the length of sick leave was positively related to the time taken to initiate psychotherapy. From these results, the authors recommend that time until beginning psychotherapy is reduced for those on sick leave with common mental disorders and suggest the need for guidelines/plans for health specialists to avoid lengthy evaluation and treatment procedures.

x
Author: Dalgaard, Aschbacher, Andersen, Glasscock, Willert, Carstensen & Biering

Return to work after work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial of a work-focused cognitive behavioral intervention (2017)

Return to work after work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial of a work-focused cognitive behavioral intervention (2017)

This study evaluated the effect of a stress management intervention on return to work (RTW). One hundred and sixty-three Danish patients who were on sick leave due to a work-related stress disorder or depression, were randomly assigned to three groups; an intervention group, control A group (who were given a clinical assessment but no treatment) and control B group (no clinical assessment or treatment). Those in the intervention group received a work-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and optional workplace intervention. The findings showed that those in the intervention group returned to work four weeks earlier than the control group A. These results suggest that a CBT intervention can encourage faster lasting RTW in comparison to the control group A.

Author: Dalgaard, Aschbacher, Andersen, Glasscock, Willert, Carstensen & Biering

Return to work after work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial of a work-focused cognitive behavioral intervention (2017)

This study evaluated the effect of a stress management intervention on return to work (RTW). One hundred and sixty-three Danish patients who were on sick leave due to a work-related stress disorder or depression, were randomly assigned to three groups; an intervention group, control A group (who were given a clinical assessment but no treatment) and control B group (no clinical assessment or treatment). Those in the intervention group received a work-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and optional workplace intervention. The findings showed that those in the intervention group returned to work four weeks earlier than the control group A. These results suggest that a CBT intervention can encourage faster lasting RTW in comparison to the control group A.

x
Author: Arends, van der Klink, van Rhenen, de Boer & Bültmann

Prevention of recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders: results of a cluster-randomised controlled trial (2014)

Prevention of recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders: results of a cluster-randomised controlled trial (2014)

This study investigates recurrent sickness absence by evaluating the SHARP at work intervention for workers, who return to work (RTW) following sickness, due to common mental disorders (CMD). The five step SHARP intervention is evidence based guidance, grounded in empowerment theories to support workers with mental health disorders RTW. To evaluate SHARP Dutch participants were split into either a SHARP or Care as Usual (CAU) group. Follow up feedback sessions were scheduled with Occupational Physicians at six, twelve and eighteen months to assess the incidence of recurrent SA. The findings showed that at each follow up the incidence of recurrent SA was lower for the SHARP group in comparison to the CAU group, emphasising the importance of continual care after RTW. These findings suggest that the SHARP at work intervention can help to reduce recurrent SA in workers with CMD. 

Author: Arends, van der Klink, van Rhenen, de Boer & Bültmann

Prevention of recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders: results of a cluster-randomised controlled trial (2014)

This study investigates recurrent sickness absence by evaluating the SHARP at work intervention for workers, who return to work (RTW) following sickness, due to common mental disorders (CMD). The five step SHARP intervention is evidence based guidance, grounded in empowerment theories to support workers with mental health disorders RTW. To evaluate SHARP Dutch participants were split into either a SHARP or Care as Usual (CAU) group. Follow up feedback sessions were scheduled with Occupational Physicians at six, twelve and eighteen months to assess the incidence of recurrent SA. The findings showed that at each follow up the incidence of recurrent SA was lower for the SHARP group in comparison to the CAU group, emphasising the importance of continual care after RTW. These findings suggest that the SHARP at work intervention can help to reduce recurrent SA in workers with CMD. 

x
Author: Volker, Zijlstra-Vlasveld, Anema, Beekman, Brouwers, Emons & van der Feltz-Cornelis

Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial (2015)

Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial (2015)

Two hundred and twenty sick listed employees (due to common mental disorders) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group, in order to evaluate a blended ehealth intervention (ECO) in comparison with care as casual (CAU) on time to return to work (RTW). The ECO intervention was a tailor-made ehealth module ranging from six to seventeen sessions (dependent on the individual’s symptoms and cognitions surrounding RTW). Those in the CAU group returned on average after 77 days sick leave, while those in the ECO group returned after 50 days, however there was no difference between groups in relation to full RTW. Further, more employees from the  ECO group achieved remission after nine months compared to the CAU group.

Author: Volker, Zijlstra-Vlasveld, Anema, Beekman, Brouwers, Emons & van der Feltz-Cornelis

Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial (2015)

Two hundred and twenty sick listed employees (due to common mental disorders) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group, in order to evaluate a blended ehealth intervention (ECO) in comparison with care as casual (CAU) on time to return to work (RTW). The ECO intervention was a tailor-made ehealth module ranging from six to seventeen sessions (dependent on the individual’s symptoms and cognitions surrounding RTW). Those in the CAU group returned on average after 77 days sick leave, while those in the ECO group returned after 50 days, however there was no difference between groups in relation to full RTW. Further, more employees from the  ECO group achieved remission after nine months compared to the CAU group.

x
Author: Pedersen, Søgaard, Labriola, Nohr & Jensen

Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder: a randomised controlled trial (2015)

Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder: a randomised controlled trial (2015)

This study evaluated the effectiveness of psychoeducation on return to work (RTW) for those on sick leave due to mental health disorders in Denmark. 430 employees on sick leave were randomly assigned to either an intervention or control group. The intervention group received six two-hour psychoeducation sessions and were measured on the relative risk (RR) of a full RTW. The results showed that during the first three months the intervention group had significantly higher RR of not fully returning to work and those who participated in four out of six psychoeducation sessions returned slower than the control group. However, after six months both groups had a similar RR of a full RTW. These findings suggest that contrary to expectations, psychoeducation should not be recommended to facilitate RTW for those on sick leave due to a mental disorder.

Author: Pedersen, Søgaard, Labriola, Nohr & Jensen

Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder: a randomised controlled trial (2015)

This study evaluated the effectiveness of psychoeducation on return to work (RTW) for those on sick leave due to mental health disorders in Denmark. 430 employees on sick leave were randomly assigned to either an intervention or control group. The intervention group received six two-hour psychoeducation sessions and were measured on the relative risk (RR) of a full RTW. The results showed that during the first three months the intervention group had significantly higher RR of not fully returning to work and those who participated in four out of six psychoeducation sessions returned slower than the control group. However, after six months both groups had a similar RR of a full RTW. These findings suggest that contrary to expectations, psychoeducation should not be recommended to facilitate RTW for those on sick leave due to a mental disorder.

x
Author: Lagerveld, Blonk, Brenninkmeijer, Meij, Schaufeli & Hurrell,

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study (2012)

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study (2012)

This study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention (W-CBT) with an optional work and return to work component in comparison with the usual cognitive psychotherapy intervention (CBT). Employees on sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMD) were split into either the CBT or the W-CBT group and followed up at three, six and twelve months later. Findings showed that employees in the W-CBT group returned to work sixty-five days earlier than those in the CBT group (and partially returned to work twelve days earlier). Work-focused cognitive psychotherapy may speed up an employee’s return to work, which can in turn provide some financial gains to employers.

Author: Lagerveld, Blonk, Brenninkmeijer, Meij, Schaufeli & Hurrell,

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study (2012)

This study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention (W-CBT) with an optional work and return to work component in comparison with the usual cognitive psychotherapy intervention (CBT). Employees on sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMD) were split into either the CBT or the W-CBT group and followed up at three, six and twelve months later. Findings showed that employees in the W-CBT group returned to work sixty-five days earlier than those in the CBT group (and partially returned to work twelve days earlier). Work-focused cognitive psychotherapy may speed up an employee’s return to work, which can in turn provide some financial gains to employers.

x

Have we missed evidence or a topic?

ADD NEW EVIDENCE OR TOOL

If you would like to be informed via email when new information is added to the Hub

We aim to update all the evidence and tools in the Hub on a regular basis in order to ensure that the Hub remains the essential resource for evidence-based practitioners. If you would like to be informed via email when new information is added to the Hub, please complete the form below. Please note, we will not pass your information on to any third parties and will only use this information to contact you about the Hub.

Type of stakeholder
I'm none of those Show more options
ALL TOPICS
Stress
Leadership/Management
Common Mental Health Problems
Workplace Design for health
Mental Health Discrimination
Mindfulness in the workplace
Obesity
Resilience
Burnout
Engagement
Chronic illness
Return to work following mental health sickness absence
Menopause
Technology and wellbeing
Cancer
Wellbeing
Musculo-skeletal disorders
You are now subscribed to our newsletter on selected topics

What do you think of the Hub?





NEXT
BACK
NEXT

Type of stakeholder
I'm none of those Show more options
BACK
SUBMIT

Thank you for your feedback

Affinity Health at Work