Tools for organisations and practitioners

Author: Munir et al

Stand More At Work (SMArT) Work (2016)

SMArT Work: Stand More AT Work is a comprehensive behaviour-change intervention developed to encourage more frequent standing and less sitting at work.  An evidence-based toolkit has been designed as a result of this research intervention including resources for the individual, manager and workplace champions. 

Author: Alker et al (for the World Green Building Council)

Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices: the next chapter for green building (2017)

This report is summarised in the Practitioner Research section above.  It also provides a simple, high level framework for measuring organisational outcomes and relating those back to the physical features of buildings and employee perceptions.  Starts on p53.

The appendices include some other useful information including:

  • Industry survey tools …p80
  • List of questions to raise with the landlord’s letting or sales agent…p86
Author: Oldenburg, Sallis, Harris and Owen

Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (C.H.E.W.) (2002)

The Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (CHEW) was designed as an observation instrument to assess characteristics of worksite environments that are known to influence health-related behaviours.  It is a 112-item checklist of workplace environmental features which have been associated with physical activity, healthy eating, alcohol consumption, and smoking. The three environmental domains assessed are (1) physical characteristics of the worksite, (2) features of the information environment, and (3) characteristics of the immediate neighbourhood around the workplace.  The tool has been shown to provide reliable and valid data, and is thus deemed to be a promising observational measure that has the potential to assess environmental influences on health behaviours.

Author: Christersson and Rothe

Central questions for Relocating Organisations from Impacts of Organisational Relocation: a conceptual framework (2012)

This study is summarised in the Academic Research section above.  It also provides a useful and comprehensive list of questions (starting on p238) that could be used by organisations that are due to relocate as a framework for planning, developing strategy and evaluating.

Author: International WELL Building Institute

WELL Building Standard (2014)

The WELL Building Standard is a global rating system that was launched in 2014 and aims to advance human health and wellbeing in the built environment.  The standard can be applied to commercial, institutional, and residential developments including new construction, core and shell, and tenant improvements. It is a system for measuring, certifying, and monitoring the performance of building features that impact health and wellbeing.  

 

Organisations pay a fee to go through the certification process, and their building will be assessed against the 11 key standards: Air, Water, Nourishment, Light, Thermal Comfort, Sound, Materials, Movement, Mind, Community and Innovation.

Author: Building Research Establishment

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environment Assessment Method) (1990)

BREEAM is a well-established global sustainability assessment method for planning infrastructure and buildings.  Using standards developed by BRE (Building Research Establishment), organisations can gain certification through third party assessment of their building’s environmental, social and economic sustainability performance. BREEAM claims that developments that meet these standards are more sustainable environments that enhance the well-being of the people who live and work in them and help protect natural resources. 

Author: US Green Building Council

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) (1993)

The LEED certification programme is a well-know ‘Green Building’ certification programme.   Development began by the non-profit US Green Building Council in 1993.   The LEED includes a set of rating systems for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of green buildings, homes, and neighborhoods.  The standards aim to help building owners and operators be environmentally responsible and use resources efficiently.  US-centric website found only.

Author: FitWel Inc.

FitWel Certification Standard (2019)

FitWel is a US based organisation operating a certification standard for health in the built environment, via a tailored scorecard approach.  The Standard lists seven ‘Health Impact’ categories:  Impacts surrounding Community health; Reduces morbidity and absenteeism; Supports social equity for vulnerable populations; Instills feelings of wellbeing; Enhances access to healthy food; Promotes occupant safety; and Increases physical activity.

 

FitWel has global reach, running projects in over 35 countries, and provides training and advice to businesses who register (minimum registration is $500).  They also train FitWel Ambassadors to use the Standard in their own organisations.  The website also offers some free ‘Building Health’ resources and toolkits.

Author: Munir et al

Stand More At Work (SMArT) Work (2016)

Stand More At Work (SMArT) Work (2016)

SMArT Work: Stand More AT Work is a comprehensive behaviour-change intervention developed to encourage more frequent standing and less sitting at work.  An evidence-based toolkit has been designed as a result of this research intervention including resources for the individual, manager and workplace champions. 

Author: Munir et al

Stand More At Work (SMArT) Work (2016)

SMArT Work: Stand More AT Work is a comprehensive behaviour-change intervention developed to encourage more frequent standing and less sitting at work.  An evidence-based toolkit has been designed as a result of this research intervention including resources for the individual, manager and workplace champions. 

x
Author: Alker et al (for the World Green Building Council)

Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices: the next chapter for green building (2017)

Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices: the next chapter for green building (2017)

This report is summarised in the Practitioner Research section above.  It also provides a simple, high level framework for measuring organisational outcomes and relating those back to the physical features of buildings and employee perceptions.  Starts on p53.

The appendices include some other useful information including:

  • Industry survey tools …p80
  • List of questions to raise with the landlord’s letting or sales agent…p86
Author: Alker et al (for the World Green Building Council)

Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices: the next chapter for green building (2017)

This report is summarised in the Practitioner Research section above.  It also provides a simple, high level framework for measuring organisational outcomes and relating those back to the physical features of buildings and employee perceptions.  Starts on p53.

The appendices include some other useful information including:

  • Industry survey tools …p80
  • List of questions to raise with the landlord’s letting or sales agent…p86

x
Author: Oldenburg, Sallis, Harris and Owen

Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (C.H.E.W.) (2002)

Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (C.H.E.W.) (2002)

The Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (CHEW) was designed as an observation instrument to assess characteristics of worksite environments that are known to influence health-related behaviours.  It is a 112-item checklist of workplace environmental features which have been associated with physical activity, healthy eating, alcohol consumption, and smoking. The three environmental domains assessed are (1) physical characteristics of the worksite, (2) features of the information environment, and (3) characteristics of the immediate neighbourhood around the workplace.  The tool has been shown to provide reliable and valid data, and is thus deemed to be a promising observational measure that has the potential to assess environmental influences on health behaviours.

Author: Oldenburg, Sallis, Harris and Owen

Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (C.H.E.W.) (2002)

The Checklist of Health Promotion Environments at Worksites (CHEW) was designed as an observation instrument to assess characteristics of worksite environments that are known to influence health-related behaviours.  It is a 112-item checklist of workplace environmental features which have been associated with physical activity, healthy eating, alcohol consumption, and smoking. The three environmental domains assessed are (1) physical characteristics of the worksite, (2) features of the information environment, and (3) characteristics of the immediate neighbourhood around the workplace.  The tool has been shown to provide reliable and valid data, and is thus deemed to be a promising observational measure that has the potential to assess environmental influences on health behaviours.

x
Author: Christersson and Rothe

Central questions for Relocating Organisations from Impacts of Organisational Relocation: a conceptual framework (2012)

Central questions for Relocating Organisations from Impacts of Organisational Relocation: a conceptual framework (2012)

This study is summarised in the Academic Research section above.  It also provides a useful and comprehensive list of questions (starting on p238) that could be used by organisations that are due to relocate as a framework for planning, developing strategy and evaluating.

Author: Christersson and Rothe

Central questions for Relocating Organisations from Impacts of Organisational Relocation: a conceptual framework (2012)

This study is summarised in the Academic Research section above.  It also provides a useful and comprehensive list of questions (starting on p238) that could be used by organisations that are due to relocate as a framework for planning, developing strategy and evaluating.

x
Author: International WELL Building Institute

WELL Building Standard (2014)

WELL Building Standard (2014)

The WELL Building Standard is a global rating system that was launched in 2014 and aims to advance human health and wellbeing in the built environment.  The standard can be applied to commercial, institutional, and residential developments including new construction, core and shell, and tenant improvements. It is a system for measuring, certifying, and monitoring the performance of building features that impact health and wellbeing.  

 

Organisations pay a fee to go through the certification process, and their building will be assessed against the 11 key standards: Air, Water, Nourishment, Light, Thermal Comfort, Sound, Materials, Movement, Mind, Community and Innovation.

Author: International WELL Building Institute

WELL Building Standard (2014)

The WELL Building Standard is a global rating system that was launched in 2014 and aims to advance human health and wellbeing in the built environment.  The standard can be applied to commercial, institutional, and residential developments including new construction, core and shell, and tenant improvements. It is a system for measuring, certifying, and monitoring the performance of building features that impact health and wellbeing.  

 

Organisations pay a fee to go through the certification process, and their building will be assessed against the 11 key standards: Air, Water, Nourishment, Light, Thermal Comfort, Sound, Materials, Movement, Mind, Community and Innovation.

x
Author: Building Research Establishment

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environment Assessment Method) (1990)

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environment Assessment Method) (1990)

BREEAM is a well-established global sustainability assessment method for planning infrastructure and buildings.  Using standards developed by BRE (Building Research Establishment), organisations can gain certification through third party assessment of their building’s environmental, social and economic sustainability performance. BREEAM claims that developments that meet these standards are more sustainable environments that enhance the well-being of the people who live and work in them and help protect natural resources. 

Author: Building Research Establishment

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environment Assessment Method) (1990)

BREEAM is a well-established global sustainability assessment method for planning infrastructure and buildings.  Using standards developed by BRE (Building Research Establishment), organisations can gain certification through third party assessment of their building’s environmental, social and economic sustainability performance. BREEAM claims that developments that meet these standards are more sustainable environments that enhance the well-being of the people who live and work in them and help protect natural resources. 

x
Author: US Green Building Council

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) (1993)

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) (1993)

The LEED certification programme is a well-know ‘Green Building’ certification programme.   Development began by the non-profit US Green Building Council in 1993.   The LEED includes a set of rating systems for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of green buildings, homes, and neighborhoods.  The standards aim to help building owners and operators be environmentally responsible and use resources efficiently.  US-centric website found only.

Author: US Green Building Council

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) (1993)

The LEED certification programme is a well-know ‘Green Building’ certification programme.   Development began by the non-profit US Green Building Council in 1993.   The LEED includes a set of rating systems for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of green buildings, homes, and neighborhoods.  The standards aim to help building owners and operators be environmentally responsible and use resources efficiently.  US-centric website found only.

x
Author: FitWel Inc.

FitWel Certification Standard (2019)

FitWel Certification Standard (2019)

FitWel is a US based organisation operating a certification standard for health in the built environment, via a tailored scorecard approach.  The Standard lists seven ‘Health Impact’ categories:  Impacts surrounding Community health; Reduces morbidity and absenteeism; Supports social equity for vulnerable populations; Instills feelings of wellbeing; Enhances access to healthy food; Promotes occupant safety; and Increases physical activity.

 

FitWel has global reach, running projects in over 35 countries, and provides training and advice to businesses who register (minimum registration is $500).  They also train FitWel Ambassadors to use the Standard in their own organisations.  The website also offers some free ‘Building Health’ resources and toolkits.

Author: FitWel Inc.

FitWel Certification Standard (2019)

FitWel is a US based organisation operating a certification standard for health in the built environment, via a tailored scorecard approach.  The Standard lists seven ‘Health Impact’ categories:  Impacts surrounding Community health; Reduces morbidity and absenteeism; Supports social equity for vulnerable populations; Instills feelings of wellbeing; Enhances access to healthy food; Promotes occupant safety; and Increases physical activity.

 

FitWel has global reach, running projects in over 35 countries, and provides training and advice to businesses who register (minimum registration is $500).  They also train FitWel Ambassadors to use the Standard in their own organisations.  The website also offers some free ‘Building Health’ resources and toolkits.

x
Author: Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors

SKA Rating Tool (2006)

SKA Rating Tool (2006)

SKA rating tool is led and owned by RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors).  It allows property and construction professionals to design, rate and certify fit-out projects for environmental impact.    The tool comprises more than a hundred 'good practice' measures covering energy and CO2 emissions, waste, water, materials, pollution, wellbeing and transport. Use of the tool is free and open to all. Projects can be certified by qualified assessors for an additional fee

Author: Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors

SKA Rating Tool (2006)

SKA rating tool is led and owned by RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors).  It allows property and construction professionals to design, rate and certify fit-out projects for environmental impact.    The tool comprises more than a hundred 'good practice' measures covering energy and CO2 emissions, waste, water, materials, pollution, wellbeing and transport. Use of the tool is free and open to all. Projects can be certified by qualified assessors for an additional fee

x
Author: Leaman, A. (with Arup Ltd)

BUS Methodology (2017)

BUS Methodology (2017)

Bus Methodology is a survey tool that organisations can use to assess building occupant satisfaction before and after an intervention e.g. office relocation.  It is delivered via a network of licensed industry partners.  The results are compared to a benchmark database and feedback from the tool can help organisations improve their building design.  It is an industry recognised tool and can be used in the process of gaining various industry certifications e.g. BREEAM, LEED, WELL Standard.

Author: Leaman, A. (with Arup Ltd)

BUS Methodology (2017)

Bus Methodology is a survey tool that organisations can use to assess building occupant satisfaction before and after an intervention e.g. office relocation.  It is delivered via a network of licensed industry partners.  The results are compared to a benchmark database and feedback from the tool can help organisations improve their building design.  It is an industry recognised tool and can be used in the process of gaining various industry certifications e.g. BREEAM, LEED, WELL Standard.

x

Have we missed evidence or a topic?

ADD NEW EVIDENCE OR TOOL

If you would like to be informed via email when new information is added to the Hub

We aim to update all the evidence and tools in the Hub on a regular basis in order to ensure that the Hub remains the essential resource for evidence-based practitioners. If you would like to be informed via email when new information is added to the Hub, please complete the form below. Please note, we will not pass your information on to any third parties and will only use this information to contact you about the Hub.

Type of stakeholder
I'm none of those Show more options
ALL TOPICS
Stress
Healthy leadership
Common Mental Health Problems
Office Design for Health and Wellbeing
Mental Health Discrimination
Mindfulness in the workplace
Obesity
Resilience
Burnout
Engagement
Chronic illness
Return to work following mental health sickness absence
Menopause
Technology and wellbeing
Cancer
Measuring psychological wellbeing
Musculo-skeletal disorders
Neurodiversity
Compassion in the workplace
Mental Health Awareness
Men's Mental Health
You are now subscribed to our newsletter on selected topics

What do you think of the Hub?





NEXT
BACK
NEXT

Type of stakeholder
I'm none of those Show more options
BACK
SUBMIT

Thank you for your feedback

Affinity Health at Work