Practitioner research

<p>Some of the strongest practitioner evidence regarding mindfulness interventions at work has been summarised below.&nbsp; These are empirical studies or work of publishable quality that provide case studies and reviews of interventions conducted in the workplace.&nbsp; The studies are presented under two headings: Manager Interventions (Mindful Leadership)&nbsp;and Individual Interventions.</p>
PRINT
Author: Reitz, Chaskalson, Olivier & Waller

The Mindful Leader. Developing the capacity for resilience and collaboration in complex times through mindfulness practice (2016)

The Mindful Leader. Developing the capacity for resilience and collaboration in complex times through mindfulness practice (2016)

This research examined whether mindfulness training and practice had an impact on leaders’ capacities for resilience, collaboration and leading in complexity.  57 senior leaders participated in a multi-methods wait-list controlled study. They participated in an eight-week mindfulness programme that was developed using both Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in addition to material specifically designed for organizational leadership.

 

12 weeks after the programme, self-report measures showed that 93% felt that the programme had developed their resilience, for complexity this was 85% and regarding collaboration this was 85%. Other areas in which participants felt impact was decreased stress, calmness and emotional regulation.  Qualitative data is also examined which supports the positive benefits of the programme. Findings also showed that the more mindfulness practice participants did the greater their increase in scores. The research suggests that for organisations it’s beneficial to have a longer programme rather than just a one-off workshop and it can be beneficial to provide space in which people can practice.

Author: Jutta Tobias

Mindfulness training at Aimia: Research study report (2016)

Mindfulness training at Aimia: Research study report (2016)

Mindfulness at Work Ltd provided a 6-week course in mindfulness training to Aimia and Cranfield University examined the impact; the results of the study are discussed in this report.  The study was comprised of an intervention group and a waitlist control group and the course was delivered either online or face to face. The findings showed that those who completed the 6 hours of mindfulness training showed significantly higher resilience compared to the control group. However, none of the other variables, emotional intelligence, self-control and working memory, showed any significant changes.  Additionally, the results did not suggest there were any differences between the modes of delivery (online or face to face), suggesting that both methods were as effective at increasing resilience. This may be beneficial for companies as internet-based interventions are often cheaper to implement than face to face interventions and are also more flexible for employees.

Author: A head for work & Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

Mindfulnet.org Mindfulness at work case study. Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

Mindfulnet.org Mindfulness at work case study. Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

34 individuals were chosen from 75 applications to participate in the course. The eight-week programme was taught in 2 hour sessions and the course was based on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT).  Two groups were taught face to face and one was taught online in a 4-6 week course and on average staff took between 7 and 12 weeks to complete it, however there was no control group. 93% to 100% perceived that mindfulness had supported them in performing better at work and 45% to 59% reported a great or significant increase in performance.  Several positive outcomes were perceived by participants e.g. 100% agreed that the training had helped them function better when under pressure and 93% agreed it helped them to focus on work better.  Outcomes also included better relationships with colleagues and higher self-compassion and some decreases in stress, anxiety and depression were also seen. The results suggested that less practice was associated with a smaller effect on work.

Author: Halliwell (Mental Health Foundation report)

TfL case study from the Mindfulness Report (2010)

TfL case study from the Mindfulness Report (2010)

This paper examined Mindfulness exploring the theory behind Mindfulness, the effectiveness of courses and Mindfulness research. This summary focuses on the effectiveness of a TfL case study that was described within the report. Amongst employees who took the six-week stress reduction workshop, which was a combination of Mindfulness, psychoeducation and CBT, a 71% decrease in the number of sick days for stress, anxiety and depression was seen over the subsequent three years. Sickness absence decreased by 50%. Additionally, 80% of course attendees described improved relationships, 79% reported they were better able to relax, 64% reported better sleep patterns and 53% stated they were happier at work. TfL identified that the two main health problems amongst employees were mental health and muscular-skeletal problems. Consequently, they established the course and any of the 20,000 employees could attend the course if they met the referral criteria.

Author: Katherine Weare

Evidence for Mindfulness: Impacts on the wellbeing and performance of school staff (2014)

Evidence for Mindfulness: Impacts on the wellbeing and performance of school staff (2014)

This paper examines the evidence base regarding mindfulness for school staff.  It explains what mindfulness is and the changes seen in the brain and body and the subjective changes described by those who practice mindfulness.  The quality of the evidence base is also examined, issues such as the reliance on self-report data are discussed.  The findings relating to the impact of mindfulness on physical health and wellbeing, stress and mental health, positive wellbeing, emotional and social capacities and performance are all discussed.  The paper concludes that the evidence suggests there are numerous benefits to practicing mindfulness such as improving occupational wellbeing and job satisfaction and that students need teachers who are skilled in mindfulness to teach it.

Author: Department of Health and NHS North West

Good practice case study. Department of Health in partnership with NHS North West. Mindfulness and work preparedness pilot (2011)

Good practice case study. Department of Health in partnership with NHS North West. Mindfulness and work preparedness pilot (2011)

The aim of this mindfulness pilot was to help 28 individuals become work prepared using mindfulness training.  Participants were from a mixture of backgrounds; some were in recovery, some were carers of those in recovery, one was an asylum seeker and some were support workers and staff. The course was 4 fortnightly sessions and was delivered by Breathworks although it was designed by a mixture of people including commissioners, training providers and service users. The results showed the course had a positive impact on mindfulness and wellbeing, the interview data also shows that participants had better mental wellbeing and physical health.  Participants also thought that the course helped to improve their confidence, self-esteem and relationships. 50% of the workless participants who completed the course are now in paid or voluntary employment.  Some participants have also subsequently carried out the first phase of mindfulness teacher training.  It is thought that it was beneficial for staff and users to attend the training together.

 

This case study also includes key challenges and key learning.  In addition, next steps and supporting material and references that can be accessed for further information are provided.

Author: Lilley, Whitehead, Howell, Jones & Pykett

Mindfulness Behaviour Change and Engagement in Public Policy. An evaluation (2014)

Mindfulness Behaviour Change and Engagement in Public Policy. An evaluation (2014)

This intervention was designed and implemented to see if practicing mindfulness could help participants in improving their understanding of the principles regarding current behaviour change policies.  15 civil service participants completed the eight-week course. The course was designed using Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) but also included theory from behavioural economics, behavioural psychology and sociology.  

 

The results showed that there was a significant improvement in the understanding of the principles of behaviour change after the training. Additionally, the results indicated that participants experienced greater overall enjoyment of life and wellbeing, stress relief, greater focused attention on the present moment, opportunity for reflection and more effective and creative team work after the course. In addition, participants claimed that in understanding their own experience, which had been facilitated by the mindfulness practice, they became more sensitive towards the views, feelings and viewpoints of others.  

 

However, this was quite a small sample size and only 5 people were interviewed in depth additionally there were differences in attendance rates. 

Author: Overholt & Vickers (American Management Association)

Stress management and mindfulness in the workplace (2014)

Stress management and mindfulness in the workplace (2014)

The American Management Association along with the Business Research Consortium carried out a Mindfulness survey in 2014.  This report details the findings from the survey. 

 

The results showed that 49% of organisations provide mindfulness-related training or resources to some degree.  It is clear that there is no single mindfulness practice that is widely used by organisations, there are a range of practices such as attention training, meditation, breathing exercises, yoga/tai chi.  The method of delivering the mindfulness is also varied including a mixture of internal trainers and external vendors and interestingly, the results showed that 67% reported that mindfulness training is voluntary.  39% viewed the mindfulness training or resources as very beneficial to the organisation and 46% viewed it as somewhat beneficial.  Specific benefits to individuals and the organisation are also discussed (e.g. controlling stress better and leaders' ability to engage employees).

Author: Schaufenbuel (UNC Executive Development)

Bringing Mindfulness to the Workplace (2014)

Bringing Mindfulness to the Workplace (2014)

This white paper discusses what mindfulness is, the business case for mindfulness in the workplace, mindfulness and leadership and gives examples of organisations that have implemented mindfulness in the workplace and discusses the positive outcomes of the mindfulness programmes (e.g. Google, Aetna, General Mills, Intel and Target).  It also includes short practical tips including how to increase mindfulness at work and five steps to more mindful meetings. The paper concludes that mindfulness is associated with many positive outcomes e.g. decreased stress, increased clarity and increased happiness and wellbeing.  These will be beneficial to organisations but additionally, specific business outcomes such as decreased absenteeism and turnover and better employee and client relationships and increased job satisfaction are also associated with mindfulness.

Author: Schmidt-Wilk

Consciousness-based management development: Case studies of international top management teams (2000)

Consciousness-based management development: Case studies of international top management teams (2000)

These case studies describe experiences of three top management teams from three organisations who participated in the Transcendental Meditation programme in corporate-supported programs. Interviews were conducted with 30 people.  The results showed a variety of findings including personal outcomes such as improved health, cognitive growth and growth of consciousness.  Management outcomes included improved communication, increased mutual acceptance, greater happiness and greater cohesiveness.

Author: Bank Workers Charity

Mindfulness in the workplace. On an upward curve (2017)

Mindfulness in the workplace. On an upward curve (2017)

In 2016, 22% of businesses in the US offered mindfulness training to staff and the figure is expected to double in 2017, companies such as Google, Aetna, Transport for London, Proctor and Gamble and Ford Motor Company are just a few of the examples of companies that have embraced mindfulness. In this white paper, written by the Bank Workers Charity, the landscape of mindfulness in the workplace is discussed.  The white paper includes information about the history of mindfulness, the evidence base for mindfulness, the business case for mindfulness and discusses how companies have introduced mindfulness at work; a case study from HSBC is also provided.

Sort By Relevance
Sort By Date Published
Author: Reitz, Chaskalson, Olivier & Waller

The Mindful Leader. Developing the capacity for resilience and collaboration in complex times through mindfulness practice (2016)

The Mindful Leader. Developing the capacity for resilience and collaboration in complex times through mindfulness practice (2016)

This research examined whether mindfulness training and practice had an impact on leaders’ capacities for resilience, collaboration and leading in complexity.  57 senior leaders participated in a multi-methods wait-list controlled study. They participated in an eight-week mindfulness programme that was developed using both Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in addition to material specifically designed for organizational leadership.

 

12 weeks after the programme, self-report measures showed that 93% felt that the programme had developed their resilience, for complexity this was 85% and regarding collaboration this was 85%. Other areas in which participants felt impact was decreased stress, calmness and emotional regulation.  Qualitative data is also examined which supports the positive benefits of the programme. Findings also showed that the more mindfulness practice participants did the greater their increase in scores. The research suggests that for organisations it’s beneficial to have a longer programme rather than just a one-off workshop and it can be beneficial to provide space in which people can practice.

Author: Reitz, Chaskalson, Olivier & Waller

The Mindful Leader. Developing the capacity for resilience and collaboration in complex times through mindfulness practice (2016)

This research examined whether mindfulness training and practice had an impact on leaders’ capacities for resilience, collaboration and leading in complexity.  57 senior leaders participated in a multi-methods wait-list controlled study. They participated in an eight-week mindfulness programme that was developed using both Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in addition to material specifically designed for organizational leadership.

 

12 weeks after the programme, self-report measures showed that 93% felt that the programme had developed their resilience, for complexity this was 85% and regarding collaboration this was 85%. Other areas in which participants felt impact was decreased stress, calmness and emotional regulation.  Qualitative data is also examined which supports the positive benefits of the programme. Findings also showed that the more mindfulness practice participants did the greater their increase in scores. The research suggests that for organisations it’s beneficial to have a longer programme rather than just a one-off workshop and it can be beneficial to provide space in which people can practice.

x
Author: Jutta Tobias

Mindfulness training at Aimia: Research study report (2016)

Mindfulness training at Aimia: Research study report (2016)

Mindfulness at Work Ltd provided a 6-week course in mindfulness training to Aimia and Cranfield University examined the impact; the results of the study are discussed in this report.  The study was comprised of an intervention group and a waitlist control group and the course was delivered either online or face to face. The findings showed that those who completed the 6 hours of mindfulness training showed significantly higher resilience compared to the control group. However, none of the other variables, emotional intelligence, self-control and working memory, showed any significant changes.  Additionally, the results did not suggest there were any differences between the modes of delivery (online or face to face), suggesting that both methods were as effective at increasing resilience. This may be beneficial for companies as internet-based interventions are often cheaper to implement than face to face interventions and are also more flexible for employees.

Author: Jutta Tobias

Mindfulness training at Aimia: Research study report (2016)

Mindfulness at Work Ltd provided a 6-week course in mindfulness training to Aimia and Cranfield University examined the impact; the results of the study are discussed in this report.  The study was comprised of an intervention group and a waitlist control group and the course was delivered either online or face to face. The findings showed that those who completed the 6 hours of mindfulness training showed significantly higher resilience compared to the control group. However, none of the other variables, emotional intelligence, self-control and working memory, showed any significant changes.  Additionally, the results did not suggest there were any differences between the modes of delivery (online or face to face), suggesting that both methods were as effective at increasing resilience. This may be beneficial for companies as internet-based interventions are often cheaper to implement than face to face interventions and are also more flexible for employees.

x
Author: A head for work & Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

Mindfulnet.org Mindfulness at work case study. Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

Mindfulnet.org Mindfulness at work case study. Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

34 individuals were chosen from 75 applications to participate in the course. The eight-week programme was taught in 2 hour sessions and the course was based on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT).  Two groups were taught face to face and one was taught online in a 4-6 week course and on average staff took between 7 and 12 weeks to complete it, however there was no control group. 93% to 100% perceived that mindfulness had supported them in performing better at work and 45% to 59% reported a great or significant increase in performance.  Several positive outcomes were perceived by participants e.g. 100% agreed that the training had helped them function better when under pressure and 93% agreed it helped them to focus on work better.  Outcomes also included better relationships with colleagues and higher self-compassion and some decreases in stress, anxiety and depression were also seen. The results suggested that less practice was associated with a smaller effect on work.

Author: A head for work & Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

Mindfulnet.org Mindfulness at work case study. Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust

34 individuals were chosen from 75 applications to participate in the course. The eight-week programme was taught in 2 hour sessions and the course was based on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT).  Two groups were taught face to face and one was taught online in a 4-6 week course and on average staff took between 7 and 12 weeks to complete it, however there was no control group. 93% to 100% perceived that mindfulness had supported them in performing better at work and 45% to 59% reported a great or significant increase in performance.  Several positive outcomes were perceived by participants e.g. 100% agreed that the training had helped them function better when under pressure and 93% agreed it helped them to focus on work better.  Outcomes also included better relationships with colleagues and higher self-compassion and some decreases in stress, anxiety and depression were also seen. The results suggested that less practice was associated with a smaller effect on work.

x
Author: Halliwell (Mental Health Foundation report)

TfL case study from the Mindfulness Report (2010)

TfL case study from the Mindfulness Report (2010)

This paper examined Mindfulness exploring the theory behind Mindfulness, the effectiveness of courses and Mindfulness research. This summary focuses on the effectiveness of a TfL case study that was described within the report. Amongst employees who took the six-week stress reduction workshop, which was a combination of Mindfulness, psychoeducation and CBT, a 71% decrease in the number of sick days for stress, anxiety and depression was seen over the subsequent three years. Sickness absence decreased by 50%. Additionally, 80% of course attendees described improved relationships, 79% reported they were better able to relax, 64% reported better sleep patterns and 53% stated they were happier at work. TfL identified that the two main health problems amongst employees were mental health and muscular-skeletal problems. Consequently, they established the course and any of the 20,000 employees could attend the course if they met the referral criteria.

Author: Halliwell (Mental Health Foundation report)

TfL case study from the Mindfulness Report (2010)

This paper examined Mindfulness exploring the theory behind Mindfulness, the effectiveness of courses and Mindfulness research. This summary focuses on the effectiveness of a TfL case study that was described within the report. Amongst employees who took the six-week stress reduction workshop, which was a combination of Mindfulness, psychoeducation and CBT, a 71% decrease in the number of sick days for stress, anxiety and depression was seen over the subsequent three years. Sickness absence decreased by 50%. Additionally, 80% of course attendees described improved relationships, 79% reported they were better able to relax, 64% reported better sleep patterns and 53% stated they were happier at work. TfL identified that the two main health problems amongst employees were mental health and muscular-skeletal problems. Consequently, they established the course and any of the 20,000 employees could attend the course if they met the referral criteria.

x
Author: Katherine Weare

Evidence for Mindfulness: Impacts on the wellbeing and performance of school staff (2014)

Evidence for Mindfulness: Impacts on the wellbeing and performance of school staff (2014)

This paper examines the evidence base regarding mindfulness for school staff.  It explains what mindfulness is and the changes seen in the brain and body and the subjective changes described by those who practice mindfulness.  The quality of the evidence base is also examined, issues such as the reliance on self-report data are discussed.  The findings relating to the impact of mindfulness on physical health and wellbeing, stress and mental health, positive wellbeing, emotional and social capacities and performance are all discussed.  The paper concludes that the evidence suggests there are numerous benefits to practicing mindfulness such as improving occupational wellbeing and job satisfaction and that students need teachers who are skilled in mindfulness to teach it.

Author: Katherine Weare

Evidence for Mindfulness: Impacts on the wellbeing and performance of school staff (2014)

This paper examines the evidence base regarding mindfulness for school staff.  It explains what mindfulness is and the changes seen in the brain and body and the subjective changes described by those who practice mindfulness.  The quality of the evidence base is also examined, issues such as the reliance on self-report data are discussed.  The findings relating to the impact of mindfulness on physical health and wellbeing, stress and mental health, positive wellbeing, emotional and social capacities and performance are all discussed.  The paper concludes that the evidence suggests there are numerous benefits to practicing mindfulness such as improving occupational wellbeing and job satisfaction and that students need teachers who are skilled in mindfulness to teach it.

x
Author: Department of Health and NHS North West

Good practice case study. Department of Health in partnership with NHS North West. Mindfulness and work preparedness pilot (2011)

Good practice case study. Department of Health in partnership with NHS North West. Mindfulness and work preparedness pilot (2011)

The aim of this mindfulness pilot was to help 28 individuals become work prepared using mindfulness training.  Participants were from a mixture of backgrounds; some were in recovery, some were carers of those in recovery, one was an asylum seeker and some were support workers and staff. The course was 4 fortnightly sessions and was delivered by Breathworks although it was designed by a mixture of people including commissioners, training providers and service users. The results showed the course had a positive impact on mindfulness and wellbeing, the interview data also shows that participants had better mental wellbeing and physical health.  Participants also thought that the course helped to improve their confidence, self-esteem and relationships. 50% of the workless participants who completed the course are now in paid or voluntary employment.  Some participants have also subsequently carried out the first phase of mindfulness teacher training.  It is thought that it was beneficial for staff and users to attend the training together.

 

This case study also includes key challenges and key learning.  In addition, next steps and supporting material and references that can be accessed for further information are provided.

Author: Department of Health and NHS North West

Good practice case study. Department of Health in partnership with NHS North West. Mindfulness and work preparedness pilot (2011)

The aim of this mindfulness pilot was to help 28 individuals become work prepared using mindfulness training.  Participants were from a mixture of backgrounds; some were in recovery, some were carers of those in recovery, one was an asylum seeker and some were support workers and staff. The course was 4 fortnightly sessions and was delivered by Breathworks although it was designed by a mixture of people including commissioners, training providers and service users. The results showed the course had a positive impact on mindfulness and wellbeing, the interview data also shows that participants had better mental wellbeing and physical health.  Participants also thought that the course helped to improve their confidence, self-esteem and relationships. 50% of the workless participants who completed the course are now in paid or voluntary employment.  Some participants have also subsequently carried out the first phase of mindfulness teacher training.  It is thought that it was beneficial for staff and users to attend the training together.

 

This case study also includes key challenges and key learning.  In addition, next steps and supporting material and references that can be accessed for further information are provided.

x
Author: Lilley, Whitehead, Howell, Jones & Pykett

Mindfulness Behaviour Change and Engagement in Public Policy. An evaluation (2014)

Mindfulness Behaviour Change and Engagement in Public Policy. An evaluation (2014)

This intervention was designed and implemented to see if practicing mindfulness could help participants in improving their understanding of the principles regarding current behaviour change policies.  15 civil service participants completed the eight-week course. The course was designed using Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) but also included theory from behavioural economics, behavioural psychology and sociology.  

 

The results showed that there was a significant improvement in the understanding of the principles of behaviour change after the training. Additionally, the results indicated that participants experienced greater overall enjoyment of life and wellbeing, stress relief, greater focused attention on the present moment, opportunity for reflection and more effective and creative team work after the course. In addition, participants claimed that in understanding their own experience, which had been facilitated by the mindfulness practice, they became more sensitive towards the views, feelings and viewpoints of others.  

 

However, this was quite a small sample size and only 5 people were interviewed in depth additionally there were differences in attendance rates. 

Author: Lilley, Whitehead, Howell, Jones & Pykett

Mindfulness Behaviour Change and Engagement in Public Policy. An evaluation (2014)

This intervention was designed and implemented to see if practicing mindfulness could help participants in improving their understanding of the principles regarding current behaviour change policies.  15 civil service participants completed the eight-week course. The course was designed using Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) but also included theory from behavioural economics, behavioural psychology and sociology.  

 

The results showed that there was a significant improvement in the understanding of the principles of behaviour change after the training. Additionally, the results indicated that participants experienced greater overall enjoyment of life and wellbeing, stress relief, greater focused attention on the present moment, opportunity for reflection and more effective and creative team work after the course. In addition, participants claimed that in understanding their own experience, which had been facilitated by the mindfulness practice, they became more sensitive towards the views, feelings and viewpoints of others.  

 

However, this was quite a small sample size and only 5 people were interviewed in depth additionally there were differences in attendance rates. 

x
Author: Overholt & Vickers (American Management Association)

Stress management and mindfulness in the workplace (2014)

Stress management and mindfulness in the workplace (2014)

The American Management Association along with the Business Research Consortium carried out a Mindfulness survey in 2014.  This report details the findings from the survey. 

 

The results showed that 49% of organisations provide mindfulness-related training or resources to some degree.  It is clear that there is no single mindfulness practice that is widely used by organisations, there are a range of practices such as attention training, meditation, breathing exercises, yoga/tai chi.  The method of delivering the mindfulness is also varied including a mixture of internal trainers and external vendors and interestingly, the results showed that 67% reported that mindfulness training is voluntary.  39% viewed the mindfulness training or resources as very beneficial to the organisation and 46% viewed it as somewhat beneficial.  Specific benefits to individuals and the organisation are also discussed (e.g. controlling stress better and leaders' ability to engage employees).

Author: Overholt & Vickers (American Management Association)

Stress management and mindfulness in the workplace (2014)

The American Management Association along with the Business Research Consortium carried out a Mindfulness survey in 2014.  This report details the findings from the survey. 

 

The results showed that 49% of organisations provide mindfulness-related training or resources to some degree.  It is clear that there is no single mindfulness practice that is widely used by organisations, there are a range of practices such as attention training, meditation, breathing exercises, yoga/tai chi.  The method of delivering the mindfulness is also varied including a mixture of internal trainers and external vendors and interestingly, the results showed that 67% reported that mindfulness training is voluntary.  39% viewed the mindfulness training or resources as very beneficial to the organisation and 46% viewed it as somewhat beneficial.  Specific benefits to individuals and the organisation are also discussed (e.g. controlling stress better and leaders' ability to engage employees).

x

Have we missed evidence or a topic?

ADD NEW EVIDENCE OR TOOL

If you would like to be informed via email when new information is added to the Hub

We aim to update all the evidence and tools in the Hub on a regular basis in order to ensure that the Hub remains the essential resource for evidence-based practitioners. If you would like to be informed via email when new information is added to the Hub, please complete the form below. Please note, we will not pass your information on to any third parties and will only use this information to contact you about the Hub.

Type of stakeholder
I'm none of those Show more options
ALL TOPICS
Stress
Healthy leadership
Common Mental Health Problems
Office Design for Health and Wellbeing
Mental Health Discrimination
Mindfulness in the workplace
Obesity
Resilience
Burnout
Engagement
Chronic illness
Return to work following mental health sickness absence
Menopause
Technology and wellbeing
Cancer
Measuring psychological wellbeing
Musculo-skeletal disorders
Neurodiversity
Compassion in the workplace
Mental Health Awareness
Men's Mental Health
You are now subscribed to our newsletter on selected topics

What do you think of the Hub?





NEXT
BACK
NEXT

Type of stakeholder
I'm none of those Show more options
BACK
SUBMIT

Thank you for your feedback

Affinity Health at Work