Practitioner research

Author: Public First

Tacking the Stigma. Using the power of sport to support men's mental health

This report focused on a mental health intervention which was geared towards males of lower socio-economic status, typically working-class men. It was recognised that males from this social class remain a 'hard-to-reach' group when it comes to tackling mental health problems; as they are reported to be less willing to discuss, seek support or engage in treatment for mental health issues. Therefore, the project which this paper reported on, was not advertised as a mental health scheme, instead, they were advertised as places for men to talk and make acquinntances with like-minded people. Sessions were run once a week for two hours by a mixture of fully-trained staf and colunteers. The sessions aimed to give participants a ‘safe space’ to chat, socialise, and participate in leisure activities such as table football, cards, and games consoles. This creates a relaxed atmosphere where people can meet others who may be experiencing similar mental health issues. Alongside the activity sessions, there were also seperate space where attendees could directly speak to facilitators or other participants about their specific mental health problems. Data which was collected throughout the first 6 months were promising. There was a 74% positive increase in mental health and physical activity, as well as a 85% increase in general wellbeing.

Author: Public First

Tacking the Stigma. Using the power of sport to support men's mental health

Tacking the Stigma. Using the power of sport to support men's mental health

This report focused on a mental health intervention which was geared towards males of lower socio-economic status, typically working-class men. It was recognised that males from this social class remain a 'hard-to-reach' group when it comes to tackling mental health problems; as they are reported to be less willing to discuss, seek support or engage in treatment for mental health issues. Therefore, the project which this paper reported on, was not advertised as a mental health scheme, instead, they were advertised as places for men to talk and make acquinntances with like-minded people. Sessions were run once a week for two hours by a mixture of fully-trained staf and colunteers. The sessions aimed to give participants a ‘safe space’ to chat, socialise, and participate in leisure activities such as table football, cards, and games consoles. This creates a relaxed atmosphere where people can meet others who may be experiencing similar mental health issues. Alongside the activity sessions, there were also seperate space where attendees could directly speak to facilitators or other participants about their specific mental health problems. Data which was collected throughout the first 6 months were promising. There was a 74% positive increase in mental health and physical activity, as well as a 85% increase in general wellbeing.

Author: Public First

Tacking the Stigma. Using the power of sport to support men's mental health

This report focused on a mental health intervention which was geared towards males of lower socio-economic status, typically working-class men. It was recognised that males from this social class remain a 'hard-to-reach' group when it comes to tackling mental health problems; as they are reported to be less willing to discuss, seek support or engage in treatment for mental health issues. Therefore, the project which this paper reported on, was not advertised as a mental health scheme, instead, they were advertised as places for men to talk and make acquinntances with like-minded people. Sessions were run once a week for two hours by a mixture of fully-trained staf and colunteers. The sessions aimed to give participants a ‘safe space’ to chat, socialise, and participate in leisure activities such as table football, cards, and games consoles. This creates a relaxed atmosphere where people can meet others who may be experiencing similar mental health issues. Alongside the activity sessions, there were also seperate space where attendees could directly speak to facilitators or other participants about their specific mental health problems. Data which was collected throughout the first 6 months were promising. There was a 74% positive increase in mental health and physical activity, as well as a 85% increase in general wellbeing.

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