Tools for organisations and practitioners

<p>In this section we include some organisational tools and several scales which aim to assess and measure compassion and self-compassion in individuals.&nbsp;</p> <p>For tools focusing on developing and improving mindfulness, please see the separate mindfulness hub topic.</p>
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Author: National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at Work

Compassion at work toolkit

Compassion at work toolkit

Developed by the Compassion at Work Sub-Group from the National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at work, this toolkit guide sets out the business case for compassion at work and provides practical examples of how it can be implemented within the workplace and provide a competitive advantage. It also includes details around the evidence which suggests that having a compassionate approach in an organisation can improve staff wellbeing and productivity. Additionally, the guidance highlights the negative outcomes and consequences where empathy and compassion are not present within the workplace.

Author: University of Brighton and Sussex and Brighton and Sussex Medical School

Cultivating compassionate care

Cultivating compassionate care

Created by the University of Brighton and Sussex and Brighton and Sussex Medical School, these activity cards were created as part of a wider research project involving focus groups and workshops with organisations. The activity cards include compassion indicators which can be used to promote discussions and small group activities around cultivating self-compassion and compassion. 

Author: Wise & Rogers In Health

Compassion resilience toolkit

Compassion resilience toolkit

Originally piloted within the educational sector, this toolkit includes information, activities and resources aimed for leadership and employees within healthcare organisations, to understand how to increase compassion resilience perspectives and skill and reduce the experience of compassion fatigue. It is recommended that the toolkit is implemented within an organisation over a two-year period and involves twelve, thirty-minute sessions. The tool focuses on compassion resilience, where an individual is able to maintain physical, emotional and mental wellbeing while responding in a compassionate manner to those who are suffering. The authors of the toolkit were a collaborative team which included educators, administrative leaders and community mental health workers.  

Author: Pommier

Compassion Scale (CS)

Compassion Scale (CS)

The CS is based on the self-compassion scale (SCS) developed by Neff (2003, see below) but considers compassion towards others. The CS uses the same three main aspects of the SCS; kindness common humanity and mindfulness, and is rated on a five-point Likert scale (1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always).

Author: Martins et al.

The Compassion Scale (CS-M)

The Compassion Scale (CS-M)

The CS-M scale is a 10 item scale which includes five aspects of compassion: generosity, hospitality, objectivity, and tolerance across social networks and relationships. The scale was originally created to measure the changes in compassion as a result of training and therefore measures practical acts of compassion.

Author: Sprecher & Fehr

Compassionate Love Scale (CLS)

Compassionate Love Scale (CLS)

The authors of this scale define compassionate love as “an attitude toward others- either close ones or strangers- which entails feelings, cognitions, and behaviours focused on care, concern, tenderness, and an orientation toward supporting, helping, and understanding others, particularly when they are suffering or in need” (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005 as cited by Elices et al., 2017). The 21 item scale has two versions (one that measures compassion towards close friends and family and another which measures compassion towards strangers), both which are scored on a 7-point Linkert scale.

Author: Hwang, Plante & Lackey

Santa Clara Brief Compassion Scale (SCBCS)

Santa Clara Brief Compassion Scale (SCBCS)

The SCBCS is a shortened version of the CLS (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005) and includes five items.

Author: Hacker

Relational compassion scale (RCS)

Relational compassion scale (RCS)

The RCS is a 16 item scale which includes four sub-scales: compassion for others, self-compassion, beliefs about how compassionate other people are to each other and beliefs about how compassionate other people are to them. Answers are scored on a 4-point Linkert scale.

Author: Poorkavoos

Roffey Park Index

Roffey Park Index

In addition to the academic scales mentioned above, Roffey Park used their Compassion in the Workplace model to develop a psychometric self-assessment tool called the Compassion at Work Index. This index, which includes 24 questions and is measured on a 5-point Linkert scale, can be used by employees to improve their compassion based on the five attributes from the Compassion in the Workplace Model: non-judgemental, tolerating personal distress, empathic, appropriate action and alive to the suffering of others.

Author: Neff

The self-compassion scale (SCS)

The self-compassion scale (SCS)

In terms of measuring self-compassion, much of the academic research focusing on self-compassion uses the self-compassion scale (SCS) when measuring as an outcome. This scale was developed by Kristin Neff (2003) and contains 26 items (or 12 items if using the short form scale by Raes et al., 2011), which are answered on a five-point Likert scale (0 being ‘‘nearly never’’ and 4 being ‘‘nearly always’’). The SCS has good test-retest reliability (r=0.93, Neff, 2003) and several studies have shown good predictive validity and positive correlations with self-compassion, reduced depression and anxiety and increased happiness, life satisfaction and optimism (Neff & Vonk, 2009). 

Author: NHS England

Towards commissioning for workplace compassion: support guide and resource pack

Towards commissioning for workplace compassion: support guide and resource pack

These resources from NHS England provide an introduction to workplace compassion and why it matters in addition to evidence-informed guidance and good practice for commissioners and providers to help them in achieving compassion in the workplace. Case studies are included. Links to a resources pack and actions and activities for workplace compassion are also provided. 

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Author: National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at Work

Compassion at work toolkit

Compassion at work toolkit

Developed by the Compassion at Work Sub-Group from the National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at work, this toolkit guide sets out the business case for compassion at work and provides practical examples of how it can be implemented within the workplace and provide a competitive advantage. It also includes details around the evidence which suggests that having a compassionate approach in an organisation can improve staff wellbeing and productivity. Additionally, the guidance highlights the negative outcomes and consequences where empathy and compassion are not present within the workplace.

Author: National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at Work

Compassion at work toolkit

Developed by the Compassion at Work Sub-Group from the National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at work, this toolkit guide sets out the business case for compassion at work and provides practical examples of how it can be implemented within the workplace and provide a competitive advantage. It also includes details around the evidence which suggests that having a compassionate approach in an organisation can improve staff wellbeing and productivity. Additionally, the guidance highlights the negative outcomes and consequences where empathy and compassion are not present within the workplace.

x
Author: University of Brighton and Sussex and Brighton and Sussex Medical School

Cultivating compassionate care

Cultivating compassionate care

Created by the University of Brighton and Sussex and Brighton and Sussex Medical School, these activity cards were created as part of a wider research project involving focus groups and workshops with organisations. The activity cards include compassion indicators which can be used to promote discussions and small group activities around cultivating self-compassion and compassion. 

Author: University of Brighton and Sussex and Brighton and Sussex Medical School

Cultivating compassionate care

Created by the University of Brighton and Sussex and Brighton and Sussex Medical School, these activity cards were created as part of a wider research project involving focus groups and workshops with organisations. The activity cards include compassion indicators which can be used to promote discussions and small group activities around cultivating self-compassion and compassion. 

x
Author: Wise & Rogers In Health

Compassion resilience toolkit

Compassion resilience toolkit

Originally piloted within the educational sector, this toolkit includes information, activities and resources aimed for leadership and employees within healthcare organisations, to understand how to increase compassion resilience perspectives and skill and reduce the experience of compassion fatigue. It is recommended that the toolkit is implemented within an organisation over a two-year period and involves twelve, thirty-minute sessions. The tool focuses on compassion resilience, where an individual is able to maintain physical, emotional and mental wellbeing while responding in a compassionate manner to those who are suffering. The authors of the toolkit were a collaborative team which included educators, administrative leaders and community mental health workers.  

Author: Wise & Rogers In Health

Compassion resilience toolkit

Originally piloted within the educational sector, this toolkit includes information, activities and resources aimed for leadership and employees within healthcare organisations, to understand how to increase compassion resilience perspectives and skill and reduce the experience of compassion fatigue. It is recommended that the toolkit is implemented within an organisation over a two-year period and involves twelve, thirty-minute sessions. The tool focuses on compassion resilience, where an individual is able to maintain physical, emotional and mental wellbeing while responding in a compassionate manner to those who are suffering. The authors of the toolkit were a collaborative team which included educators, administrative leaders and community mental health workers.  

x
Author: Pommier

Compassion Scale (CS)

Compassion Scale (CS)

The CS is based on the self-compassion scale (SCS) developed by Neff (2003, see below) but considers compassion towards others. The CS uses the same three main aspects of the SCS; kindness common humanity and mindfulness, and is rated on a five-point Likert scale (1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always).

Author: Pommier

Compassion Scale (CS)

The CS is based on the self-compassion scale (SCS) developed by Neff (2003, see below) but considers compassion towards others. The CS uses the same three main aspects of the SCS; kindness common humanity and mindfulness, and is rated on a five-point Likert scale (1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always).

x
Author: Martins et al.

The Compassion Scale (CS-M)

The Compassion Scale (CS-M)

The CS-M scale is a 10 item scale which includes five aspects of compassion: generosity, hospitality, objectivity, and tolerance across social networks and relationships. The scale was originally created to measure the changes in compassion as a result of training and therefore measures practical acts of compassion.

Author: Martins et al.

The Compassion Scale (CS-M)

The CS-M scale is a 10 item scale which includes five aspects of compassion: generosity, hospitality, objectivity, and tolerance across social networks and relationships. The scale was originally created to measure the changes in compassion as a result of training and therefore measures practical acts of compassion.

x
Author: Sprecher & Fehr

Compassionate Love Scale (CLS)

Compassionate Love Scale (CLS)

The authors of this scale define compassionate love as “an attitude toward others- either close ones or strangers- which entails feelings, cognitions, and behaviours focused on care, concern, tenderness, and an orientation toward supporting, helping, and understanding others, particularly when they are suffering or in need” (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005 as cited by Elices et al., 2017). The 21 item scale has two versions (one that measures compassion towards close friends and family and another which measures compassion towards strangers), both which are scored on a 7-point Linkert scale.

Author: Sprecher & Fehr

Compassionate Love Scale (CLS)

The authors of this scale define compassionate love as “an attitude toward others- either close ones or strangers- which entails feelings, cognitions, and behaviours focused on care, concern, tenderness, and an orientation toward supporting, helping, and understanding others, particularly when they are suffering or in need” (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005 as cited by Elices et al., 2017). The 21 item scale has two versions (one that measures compassion towards close friends and family and another which measures compassion towards strangers), both which are scored on a 7-point Linkert scale.

x
Author: Hwang, Plante & Lackey

Santa Clara Brief Compassion Scale (SCBCS)

Santa Clara Brief Compassion Scale (SCBCS)

The SCBCS is a shortened version of the CLS (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005) and includes five items.

Author: Hwang, Plante & Lackey

Santa Clara Brief Compassion Scale (SCBCS)

The SCBCS is a shortened version of the CLS (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005) and includes five items.

x
Author: Hacker

Relational compassion scale (RCS)

Relational compassion scale (RCS)

The RCS is a 16 item scale which includes four sub-scales: compassion for others, self-compassion, beliefs about how compassionate other people are to each other and beliefs about how compassionate other people are to them. Answers are scored on a 4-point Linkert scale.

Author: Hacker

Relational compassion scale (RCS)

The RCS is a 16 item scale which includes four sub-scales: compassion for others, self-compassion, beliefs about how compassionate other people are to each other and beliefs about how compassionate other people are to them. Answers are scored on a 4-point Linkert scale.

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